autumndewildedcfc.jpg
Autumn de Wilde
Sure, you could buy your favorite music-lover an iTunes gift card or a CD or even some vinyl this holiday season--but why

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Today Reverb Recommends You Give Books, Not Just Music, This Holiday Season

autumndewildedcfc.jpg
Autumn de Wilde
Sure, you could buy your favorite music-lover an iTunes gift card or a CD or even some vinyl this holiday season--but why not instead opt to think outside the box and share some of 2010's best music-related printings?

Death Cab For Cutie, $30 The result of photographer Autumn de Wilde's years spent on the road and in the studio with our favorite local indie-rockers, this 192-page photo book was recently discussed by SW writer Michael Alan Goldberg: "She e-mailed the band's management to ask if she could intermittently follow the foursome for a long-term project. Six years and numerous tours and recording sessions later, de Wilde has published Death Cab for Cutie--her third book of photos, following ones devoted to Smith and the White Stripes--which candidly captures the band onstage, backstage, in the studio, and in some of their quieter, more intimate moments."

Decoded, $35 A memoir only in the way that it manages to unpack the prolific rapper's life through his rhymes, Jay-Z's book has made waves for good reason. It includes powerful glimpses into the narratives that shaped his music, including gems like the fact that the use of the word "bitch" in his hit song "99 Problems" isn't derogatorily referring to a woman like he came under fire for--it's about the drug dog that nearly sent him to prison and ended his career before it began. In his words: "When you're famous and say you're writing a book, people assume that it's an autobiography--I was born here, raised there, suffered this, loved that, lost it all, got it back, the end. But that's not what this is. I've never been a linear thinker, which is something you can see in my rhymes. They follow the jumpy logic of poetry and emotion, not the straight line of careful prose. My book is like that, too."

Life, $30 The Keith Richards memoir isn't your typical rock bio--in no small part due to the fact that The Rolling Stones are no typical rock band. The New York Times called it a "high-velocity portrait of the era when rock 'n' roll came of age, a raw report from deep inside the counterculture maelstrom of how that music swept like a tsunami over Britain and the United States."

And for the person you either like a whole lot or not much at all, there's always Cookin' With Coolio. Any cookbook advertising fried chicken that "would literally put on tennis shoes and run the fuck into your mouth" is probably worth a shot.

 
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