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Last night Mayor McGinn held a Nightlife Initiative update meeting at the Central District's Washington Hall, announcing tweaks to parking passes, liquor laws, and noise

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Do Noise Level Rules Need Changing? Maybe Not, According to City Residents

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Last night Mayor McGinn held a Nightlife Initiative update meeting at the Central District's Washington Hall, announcing tweaks to parking passes, liquor laws, and noise ordinance violations. Noise violations are said to be a problem that needs addressing. But, reports the Daily Weekly's Keegan Hamilton,

According to the Mayor's press release, just six percent of the 2,400 city residents who offered feedback on the nightlife initiative reported having "a significant problem with nightlife-related noise at least once per month." More than 65 percent, meanwhile, said they never had a noise problem.
So what are McGinn's new rules going to entail?Read more about the mayor's take on decibel levels and bass-heavy hip hop on the Daily Weekly.

UPDATE 1:42 p.m.: McGinn spokesman Mark Matassa points out that the ordinance passed in 2007 did not set the sound level threshold at 80 decibels. In fact, it didn't establish any threshold at all. The 80 decibel confusion, he says, comes from a number that was originally proposed by McGinn during the community meetings. Residents, however, gave "so much negative feedback and were concerned it was way too loud" so the 65 decibel standard was compromise that was reached after talking to residents and club owners.

Matassa also notes that in lieu of paying fines, a club or venue that receives multiple noise complaints could use the money they owe the city to install soundproofing.

 
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