The folks at Pitchfork made an interesting discovery yesterday when they noticed a song in a Spanish language commercial for the sports equipment company Kipsta

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5 Other Local Artists Ripe to Be Ripped Off In TV Commercials

The folks at Pitchfork made an interesting discovery yesterday when they noticed a song in a Spanish language commercial for the sports equipment company Kipsta sounded eerily close to "White Winter Hymnal" by Fleet Foxes. It made me think about the Kia car commercial that more or less ripped off the Moondoggies' "Undertaker" earlier this year.

While those two bands are fine choices for copycat composers to musically mimic, there's lots of local talent for advertisers to cherry pick when it comes to creating a soundtrack for a commercial. Here are five songs by locals that would sound good in a commercial.

1. Grynch "My Volvo." It's surprising a commercial hasn't already been made using the King of Ballard's hit considering the folks at Volvo already know about Grynch's ode to his '86 DL. If the suits in Volvo's marketing department don't think this song screams car commercial then they should all be fired.

2. Brent Amaker and the Rodeo "Bring Me The Whiskey." I don't think a better drinking song has been written since "99 Bottles of Beer." Sure the chorus of "Bring me the whiskey/I need a drink/I need a drink" isn't the cheeriest material for a singalong, but I'm betting it would move booze by the gallon.

3. Mt St Helens Vietnam Band "Albatross, Albatross, Albatross."

This song goes in so many different directions it could work for just about any type of product, but given its spooky video I think it would sound best in the trailer of a horror film.

4. Macklemore "Letterhead." Is it wrong to think "Letterhead" would be the perfect anthem for a company like Krylon or Sharpie? Just because those companies would be using a song about graffiti to promote their products wouldn't mean they condone illegal urban art. Or would it?

5. The Head and the Heart "Ghosts." I'm not sure what this song would endorse, but considering The Head and the Heart is being billed as one of the biggest bands to break from Seattle since the days of the g-word it's only a matter of time before some corporate entity appropriates the band's sound for its own commercial interest.

 
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