Tonight: Blue Giant, YES & Peter Frampton, Cataldo, Maps & Atlases, The Globes

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Blue Giant. Sonic Boom Records Capitol Hill, 1525 Melrose Ave., 568-BOOM. 7 p.m. Free. All ages. When Conor Oberst went from angsty indie to twangy

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Tonight: Blue Giant, YES & Peter Frampton, Cataldo, Maps & Atlases, The Globes

  • Tonight: Blue Giant, YES & Peter Frampton, Cataldo, Maps & Atlases, The Globes

  • ">

    bluegiantband1.jpg
    Blue Giant. Sonic Boom Records Capitol Hill, 1525 Melrose Ave., 568-BOOM. 7 p.m. Free. All ages. When Conor Oberst went from angsty indie to twangy country, he sounded a little ridiculously in foreign territory. But when Kevin and Anita Robinson of the fuzzy, psychedelic Portland rock duo Viva Voce expanded to become the rootsy country quintet Blue Giant, the transition seemed much smoother. The Robinsons have roots in their blood, originally coming to the Northwest from Nashville by way of Alabama. Since forming in 2008, Blue Giant's spent much of their career playing shows in their hometown with friends like Corin Tucker of Sleater-Kinney, M. Ward, and the Portland Cello Project. But now they're touring in support of their new self-title full-length, a collection of full and folksy songs deeply steeped in the blues. ERIN K. THOMPSON

    YES & Peter Frampton. Snoqualmie Casino, 37500 SE North Bend Way; Snoqualmie, 425-888-1234. 6 p.m. Sold out. It's safe to say that Yes hold more than their fair share of blame for the current bloated onslaught of jam bands. However, drop a needle on a vinyl copy of Fragile or Close To The Edge while losing yourself in Roger Dean's moonscapes and all is forgiven. Yes somehow manage to combine the harmonic love of Simon and Garfunkel, the jam-session vibe of early Grateful Dead and the darker, more atmospheric explorations of Pink Floyd and a love for the uplifting beauty of classical music into a challenging (but incredibly palatable) presentation. While the band has had the typical share of lineup changes and periods of less than stellar work that come with being together for more than 40 years, Yes continues to show that progressive pop doesn't have to be dumbed down to make an impact. GREGORY FRANKLIN

    Cataldo, with Loch Lomond, Kyle Bradford. Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-7416. 8 p.m. $8. There's nothing too new about Cataldo, the mostly-but-not-always-solo project of Eric Anderson. He's a guy who writes head-bobby pop songs with simple chords on acoustic guitar, banjo or piano, and most of them are about the most universal pop theme of all time: love. But there's a reason why this stuff works - with lyrics so carefully conversational, Cataldo is just helplessly infectious. Anderson recently toured with Laura Veirs and usually plays his shows with a rotating cast of familiar local musicians. It's really just a bunch of friends having fun onstage--the perfect, sunny sound for the summer. MARY PAULINE DIAZ

    Maps & Atlases, with The Globes, Drink Up Buttercup. Vera Project, 305 Harrison St., 956-8372. 7:30 p.m. $11. All ages. Read all about it.

     
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