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Crash Test Dummies. Triple Door, 216 Union St., 838-4333. 8 p.m. $25. All ages. What's the difference between Crash Test Dummies and The National? Let's

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Tonight: Crash Test Dummies at the Triple Door, Jack The Ripper at Nectar, The Sadies at the High Dive

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Crash Test Dummies. Triple Door, 216 Union St., 838-4333. 8 p.m. $25. All ages. What's the difference between Crash Test Dummies and The National? Let's start with the obvious: Crash Test Dummies measure albums sold in the mid-millions. The National have yet to go gold (500,000 units) with any of their records. The National are the cool kids from Brooklyn, deep-throated by critics and embraced by the indie ghetto. Crash Test Dummies are a one-hit-wonder punchline who just released Oooh La La!, their first album in six years. But go back and take a listen to the Dummies' once-ubiquitous hit, "Mmm Mmm Mmm Mmm," or its predecessor, "Superman's Song," then give a listen to The National's "Racing Like a Pro" and try to convince yourself you're not listening to an aural doppelganger. There is indeed something comforting about a well-placed baritone. So let me tell you a story: "Once, there was this boy who ..." CHRIS KORNELIS

Jack The Ripper, with Grynch, Spaceman, Sol, Khingz, Rockwell Powers, Hill-B. Nectar, 412 N. 36th St., 632-2020. 9 p.m. $5. While first records were once upon a time meant to prove depth and expertise, the recent trend sees artists using their debut to showcase range across varying sounds. Jack The Ripper will admit he had that goal from the beginning for his debut producer LP Don't Look Back. While some might nitpick at the album's lack of consistency, its strength is its eclecticism and ability to bounce from braggadocio-laden synth hooks to a rawer hip-hop. And featuring an array of the town's finest emcees including Grynch, Sol, Khingz and Spaceman, all of whom will be performing their contributions, Jack's release party promises a taste of the best Seattle hip-hop has to offer. NICK FELDMAN

The Sadies, with Kurt Vile. High Dive, 513 N. 36th St., 632-0212. 9 p.m. $15. It's a shame that Toronto's the Sadies are best known for their collaborations with other artists. Except for Country Club, a 2009 album the band recorded with former X frontman John Doe, and The Tigers Have Spoken, which they recorded with Neko Case in 2004, a Sadies record has never managed to make a single Billboard chart. But the Sadies have been releasing solid country rock records for well over a decade. The latest in that catalog, Darker Circles, invokes the band's faint but unmistakable metal influences as well as the bluegrass with which the band's founding members, Travis and Dallas Good, grew up. With any luck, this will be the album that finally shows the world that the Sadies don't need famous collaborators to make fantastic records. SARA BRICKNER

 
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