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Bane, with Strike Anywhere, Touche Amore, Lowtalker. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8000. 7 p.m. $13. To still be a hardcore punk musician these

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Tonight: Bane at Chop Suey, Deadstring Brothers at the Tractor

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Bane, with Strike Anywhere, Touche Amore, Lowtalker. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8000. 7 p.m. $13. To still be a hardcore punk musician these days takes dedication. It's been close to a decade since bands like AFI or H20 were signing major label deals or getting mainstream attention. But none of this seems to matter to Massachusetts-based Bane, who have been making fist pumping, hard-driving punk since 1995, and show no signs of slowing down. Aaron Dalbec and company will be touring coast this summer to celebrate their latest EP. And unlike Rise Against, Bane's music still sounds pretty much the same as it did 15 years ago: breakdowns, heavy guitars, and shouting lyrics about living straight-edge. Bane may be grown up, but they're still teenagers at heart. PAIGE RICHMOND

Deadstring Brothers, with Betsy Olson, Lizzie Huffman & Her Brother Band. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599. 9 p.m. $10. The Deadstring Brothers are commonly tagged as alt-country and/or Americana. This makes not a lick of sense. I'm spinning the Bros' new album Sao Paulo right this second; what I'm hearing is a band well-versed in denim-clad classic rock. We're talking vintage boogie laced with piano, organ and slide guitar. There are also touches of pedal steel and heartfelt choruses steeped in gospel, blues and whiskey. These last two elements do lend the music a countryish flavor. But it's not as if rock-and-roll tradition has no claim on them. If Sao Paulo really is alt-country, then so are Exile on Main St., the Black Crowes, a lot of Aerosmith's early jams and hell, even Cinderella's Heartbreak Station. JUSTIN F. FARRAR
 
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