ThankMeLater.jpg
Artist: Drake

Album: Thank Me Later

Label: Young Money Entertainment

Release date: June 15 (Today)

Rating (Skip, Stream, or Buy): Buy

Listen Download: "Miss Me"

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Forget the Haters and the Hype: Drake's Thank Me Later is Worth the Purchase and the Spins

ThankMeLater.jpg
Artist: Drake

Album: Thank Me Later

Label: Young Money Entertainment

Release date: June 15 (Today)

Rating (Skip, Stream, or Buy): Buy

Listen Download: "Miss Me" Feat. Lil Wayne

Thank Me Later Day is finally here! Easily the most anticipated hip-hop album of the year--and seemingly one of the most in recent memory--Drake's official studio debut is drawing predictions of striking the million-sold mark of his mentor Lil Wayne's Tha Carter III. And while the cosigns and features from game giants like Jay-Z, Young Jeezy and T.I. make it clear that the young Canadian soap-star-turned-R&B-rapper has achieved a certain stature, the album's solo tracks (especially "Over" and "Show Me a Good Time") display a confidence of flow that prove he's got the skill to back his hype. It's also interesting to note the near complete lack of party cuts. In fact, over the course of 14 tracks he utters the word "I" over 400 times, more in a display of Cudi-esque emo prowess lamenting the torments of fame than a Weezy-esque glorification of it. But whether effortlessly matching The-Dream while crooning sweet nothings or matching bars to the greats, Drake evokes the emotion and imagery of a "last name Ever, first name Greatest" that rests perfectly over production from the likes of Boi-1da. So what about the haters? From Columbia University Professor Marc Lamont Hill to NPR's Andrew Noz, there has been no shortage of shots at Drake's unapologetic corporate approach of signing with a major label despite achieving the equivalent success level independently. Is TML a pop album masquerading as hip-hop? Maybe. But what it undoubtedly stands for is a moment of solidarity in the scene, when hip-hop heads from top to bottom are speaking out about buying the album to make a statement on the commercial viability of hip-hop music. And as for me, I'd say it's a prime candidate.

 
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