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Coalesce, with Converge, Black Breath, Lewd Acts. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9467. 7 p.m. $15. It's pretty awesome when a band that's been around

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Tonight: Coalesce at Neumos, The Eagles at Key Arena, Boy Eats Drum Machine at the Tractor

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Coalesce, with Converge, Black Breath, Lewd Acts. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9467. 7 p.m. $15. It's pretty awesome when a band that's been around for 16+ years is making the most mind-blowing music of their career. Kansas City's Coalesce has always been known as a trailblazer in brutally technical, no-nonsense hardcore, full of hoarse-throated vocals, grinding bass lines, sinewy guitars, and whiplash time changes. Now, after Lord knows how many breakups, indefinite hiatuses, and lineup changes, Coalesce is as virile and dangerous a beast as ever. The band seems intent on writing more epic, literate, and slightly more traditional (for Coalesce, at least) arrangements that allow their songs more room to breathe and seethe. In a scene known for jock-y muscle-flexing and posturing, Coalesce is much more intent on flexing their minds. GREGORY FRANKLIN

The Eagles. Key Arena, 305 Harrison St., 682-8225. 8 p.m. $55-$185. All ages. According to Hotel California, Barney Hoskyns' engrossing history of Los Angeles country-rock, older California heads like David Crosby and Gram Parsons disliked the Eagles when the quartet started out in the early 1970s. They were too packaged, they thought, performing with a professionalism that bordered on sterile. Yet it's the Eagles dogged adherence to consistency that saved them from devolving into adult-contemporary blah (Crosby), as well as death (Parsons). Four decades later and the Eagles still churn out meaningful country-rock. Compare 2007's Long Road Out of Eden to the group's masterful 1972 debut, and you won't hear much difference quality-wise. My only quibble is this: why not ask founding member Bernie Leadon to rejoin the fray? He's the one who taught the Eagles those fabulous harmonies. JUSTIN F. FARRAR

Boy Eats Drum Machine, with That 1 Guy. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599. 9 p.m. $12. The songs on Boy Eats Drum Machine's latest album, Hoop & Wire, are heavier on the dance beats, faster, and more up-tempo that some of the synthier, groove-laden tracks from 2008's Booomboxxx. But Portland's John Ragel--the "boy" and the "drum machine" behind the one-man electronic act--makes sure his favorite instruments are still front and center. Percussion is the star of "Constellation," and the saxophone makes a guest appearance on the album's title track. While all of his songs are catchy and sometimes complex, the most captivating aspect of Boy Eats Drum Machine is watching the intricate dance Ragel pulls off live. From scratching records to tapping his laptop or playing his sax, Ragel's performance embodies the energy of his music. PAIGE RICHMOND

 
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