Tonight: Brooks & Dunn, Liars, Rosanne Cash, Christopher Francis & Son

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Brooks & Dunn, with Jason Aldean, Tyler Dickerson. Tacoma Dome, 2727 E. D St., 253-272-3663. 7:30 p.m. $49.75-$65.75. In this era of mega-reunions and triumphant

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Tonight: Brooks & Dunn, Liars, Rosanne Cash, Christopher Francis & Son

  • Tonight: Brooks & Dunn, Liars, Rosanne Cash, Christopher Francis & Son

  • ">

    Brooks-and-Dunn.jpg
    Brooks & Dunn, with Jason Aldean, Tyler Dickerson. Tacoma Dome, 2727 E. D St., 253-272-3663. 7:30 p.m. $49.75-$65.75. In this era of mega-reunions and triumphant comebacks, Brooks & Dunn are doing the opposite--calling it quits. After being introduced 20 years ago by Arista Records, the aspiring Nashville songwriters went on to become the biggest selling duo in music history, even bigger than Simon & Garfunkel. Now that they're breaking up, it's easier to assess their body of work. Though they did give us "Boot Scootin' Boogie," they also delivered countless songs of actual substance concerned with the human condition in small town U.S.A, ones that had little to do with religion or political affiliation. And that is the root of B&D's success--like Oprah, they were unifiers, not dividers. They pleased the alt-country crowd with Red Dirt Road and gave line-dancers an anthem ("Boot Scootin' Boogie"). And they made millions and millions of dollars while working-class rednecks cheered them on. Only in America. BRIAN J. BARR

    Liars, with Fol Chen, Flexions. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9467. 8 p.m. $13. The noise-punk trio Liars are always on the lookout for inspiration - they conceived one album after moving to a cabin in the woods of New Jersey to study witchcraft; another was recorded in East Berlin and follows two fictitious characters named Drum and Mount Heart Attack. But the band's latest record, Sisterworld, was written as a reflection of the seedy side of life in L.A., the city where they all first met. Sisterworld has a manic temperament, sometimes slowing down to a sludgy drag, sometimes kicking to life with wailing organs, thrashing drums, and lead singer Angus Andrews' startlingly guttural vocals. It's a thrillingly aggressive and chaotic effect. ERIN K. THOMPSON

    Rosanne Cash. Moore Theatre, 1932 Second Ave., 877-STG-4TIX. 8 p.m. $30-$45. It's often a difficult path when children try to follow in the footsteps of their famous parents; most times they're crushed by the weight of expectations. Not so for Rosanne Cash, Johnny's eldest daughter. She's fashioned a tremendous discography of her own over the past three decades, earned Grammys, written notable short fiction and essays, and furthered the Cash family legacy in her own unique way. Tonight, she'll sit onstage with NPR's Michele Norris - host of All Things Considered - for a wide-ranging conversation about her work and her family. Of course, Cash will also perform a bunch of her own tunes and a few traditional country standards, too. MICHAEL ALAN GOLDBERG

    Christopher Francis & Son, with Shenandoah, Kaylee Cole. Jewelbox/Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., 441-5823. 10:30 p.m. $7. This Olympia concern fronted by one Christopher Francis is at once a soul-fueled, operatic trio of riff-rockers, and absurd exhibitionists who drop rhymes and pseudo covers on stage that may or may not be planned. They're spastic. They're irreverent to the point that they're dead serious. They sometimes keep time on a dustpan, an "instrument" that gets a cameo on their self-titled cassette. When Francis stares into the nothing--like I saw him do at Olympia's Northern, in March--the way the rest of us stare into the bathroom mirror, you wonder what's on his mind, until he says it: "Don't go chasing waterfalls! Please stick to the rivers and the lakes that we're used to!" CHRIS KORNELIS

     
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