Lilja and Inga Birgisdóttir.jpg
Lilja and Inga Birgisdóttir
Jónsi, with Death Vessel. Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S., 382-7877. 8 p.m. $31. While Sigur Rós has been fading into

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Tonight: Jónsi, The Church at the Showboxes, Spoon at the Moore

Lilja and Inga Birgisdóttir.jpg
Lilja and Inga Birgisdóttir
Jónsi, with Death Vessel. Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S., 382-7877. 8 p.m. $31. While Sigur Rós has been fading into an "indefinite hiatus," the group's frontman Jón Birgisson went and made the best record of his career. Retaining some of his band's atmospheric elements, Go sports poppier, more energetic tunes sung primarily in English rather than vowel-heavy "language" Hopelandic, but still in that ethereal falsetto. The record's enchanting surges of string orchestration feel stunningly cinematic, and that picturesque quality will be embodied in an epic staging created by London-based 59 Productions. Dubbed "a cross between film, art installation, theatre performance and live gig," the show projects a natural world in which animals are brought to life and film meets lighting and prop. And if it does justice to Jónsi's imaginative quality as it claims, the performance will be as monumental as the music. NICK FELDMAN

Spoon, with Deerhunter, Micachu & The Shapes. Moore Theatre, 1932 Second Ave., 877-STG-4TIX. 6:30 p.m. $27.50. With their latest effort, Transference, Austin's Spoon have proven themselves to be one of the few late-nineties bands who've managed to hold onto their cred and blow up without ever giving off the feeling of commercial pandering. You could say Britt Daniel and company have achieved indie nirvana: they sell out without selling out. Musically, at their best, Spoon are on par with Wilco, their genre-melding contemporaries, who manage to keep their sound forward-moving while still hanging on to the basic elements which endeared them to their fans in the first place. At their worst, when things get a little too heavy on piano (as exhibited by the '07 track "The Underdog"), they can sound like a slightly more tolerable Billy Joel. Which, in the universe of Spoon, doesn't seem at all purposeful, just an after-effect of taking yet another melodious risk. MA'CHELL DUMA LAVASSAR

The Church. Showbox at the Market, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151. 9 p.m. $28. For 30 years, the interplay between guitarists Peter Koppes and Marty Willson-Piper has defined the trippy art-rock sound of this Australian quartet. At turns moody, frantic, shimmering, and atmospheric, they provide an exhilarating counterpoint to Steve Kilbey's languid, narcotized vocals. Using the post-punk and neo-psychedelic pop of the early '80s as a jumping-off point, the Church have covered a multitude of musical bases over the past three decades -- scoring a hit single, "Under the Milky Way", in 1988 -- all while battling drugs, record companies and occasionally each other. This tour, dubbed "An Intimate Space," is all-acoustic, with the band counting backward through their 23 studio releases, playing a track off each. In a nod to their fans' loyalty, all ticket holders will receive a copy of the Deadman's Hand EP. MICHAEL MAHONEY

 
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