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Born Anchors, with Nazca Lines, Ticktockman, Fireworks. Comet Tavern, 922 E. Pike St., 323-9853. 9 p.m. $6. Since the Blood Brothers broke up in 2007,

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Tonight: Born Anchors, Deer Tick, David Grisman Quintet

Born Anchors.jpg
Born Anchors, with Nazca Lines, Ticktockman, Fireworks. Comet Tavern, 922 E. Pike St., 323-9853. 9 p.m. $6. Since the Blood Brothers broke up in 2007, there's been a tangible shortage of smart, listenable post-punk in Seattle. The genre--somewhat dissonant, almost always dark--fell out fashion early in the aughties and never really found its footing again. (It's not any particular band's fault, but the overexposure of the Used and My Chemical Romance didn't help.) Fortunately, there's Born Anchors to fill the gap. "Deep Cuts," one of many tempo-changing, powerful tracks from 2009's Sprezzatura, is so full of intricate guitar work and fast drumming that it's hard to believe only three musicians recorded the song. That's the greatest appeal of the Seattle trio: while channeling new wave and punk, their music still manages to sound simple and effortless. PAIGE RICHMOND

Deer Tick, with Holy Sons. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599. 9 p.m. $15. Rhode Island's Deer Tick plays Americana music in the vein of Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers - rootsy, guttural rock-and-roll. The band started as a solo project for the then-19-year-old songwriter John J. McCauley III but now operates as a quartet, including their newest member, guitarist Ian O'Neil, who last year left Titus Andronicus to play with Deer Tick full-time. McCauley and co. are hitting up the festival circuit this summer, including Coachella and Lollapalooza, in support of their third full-length, The Black Dirt Sessions. While Deer Tick lyrics typically skew towards (in true Americana tradition) women, drinking, and the blues, their new single, "20 Miles," has McCauley hoarsely singing such sweet lyrics as "If you're running away/ I'm looking for you/ And if you've lost your way/ I'm seeing you through." ERIN K. THOMPSON

David Grisman Quintet. Jazz Alley, 2033 Sixth Ave., 441-9729. 7:30 p.m. $32.50. When a player is as obscenely skilled as mandolinist David Grisman, the risk is that the music will be so technically proficient that the performance will slip into auto-snore mode. On the flipside, chances are high that your mind will be sufficiently blown by his or her musical prowess. I've seen Grisman enough times to know that he's capable of tearing open your skull with his colorful acoustic adventures. Taking the instrument where no other has before, Grisman's music has morphed into a vast, swirly trip, informed by practically every genre of music ever played by humans, ever. A friend of the late Jerry Garcia, Grisman's music is akin to the Dead's if that band's members were straight-A over-achievers. In other words, before going off on a musical trip, he first learns all there is to know about where he's headed. BRIAN J. BARR

 
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