mad rad ryan lewis.jpg
Ryan Lewis
The Crocodile's One Year Anniversary Party, with Mad Rad, Throw Me the Statue, The Globes. Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-7416. 8 p.m. $15.

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Tonight: The Crocodile's One Year Anniversary Party, Clinton Fearon, Scout Niblett

mad rad ryan lewis.jpg
Ryan Lewis
The Crocodile's One Year Anniversary Party, with Mad Rad, Throw Me the Statue, The Globes. Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-7416. 8 p.m. $15. The first year of nearly any new endeavor tends to fly by. This is the case with the reincarnation of the Crocodile, which re-opened its doors to great expectations in March of 2009, after new owners revived the fallen space. In the intervening months, there has been much predictable grumbling about the venue's slicker design and inexplicable dearth of punk and harder rock shows, but there have also been some landmark moments that will go down as important pieces of Seattle music history. The spontaneous, semi-reunion of "Tadgarden" made international headlines, and the resounding success of Go! Machine was an indisputable benchmark in the growth spurt of the local hip-hop community. Tonight the venue celebrates those accomplishments with Go! Machine mavericks Mad Rad and arty indie pop darlings Throw Me the Statue and the Globes. HANNAH LEVIN

Clinton Fearon & The Boogie Brown Band, with Selecta Raiford. Nectar, 412 N. 36th St., 632-2020. 9 p.m. $10. Before relocating to Seattle in the late '80s, the Jamaican-born reggae artist Clinton Fearon spent nearly two decades handling bass and vocals with legendary Kingston outfit The Gladiators and working as a house musician for Lee "Scratch" Perry. Upon his arrival in the Northwest, "Basie" continued his dub tradition by forming the six-piece Boogie Brown Band, an experienced brigade of instrumentalists covering strings, brass and percussion. The prolific Fearon is a reggae icon, and while he may be best known for his infectious bass riffs - hence the nickname - his work with the Boogie Brown Band is proof that his songwriting and vocal abilities are equal strengths. With uplifting vibes and danceable melodies, Fearon exhibits the best of roots reggae. NICK FELDMAN

Scout Niblett, with Holy Sons, Ghosts To Falco. Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-4880. 9:30 p.m. $8. Based on the simplest description, British-born Scout Niblett should be much more popular than she is. A stripped-down singer-songwriter, she lives in Portland and collaborates with producer Steve Albini, who has recorded the Pixies, Joanna Newsom, and PJ Harvey. Her 2007 record, This Fool Can Die Now, featured harmonized folk duets with Will Oldham, a.k.a Bonnie Prince Billy. Those details, though, just make Niblett sound like another Cat Power and don't get to the heart of her music. She deals in alienation, both in her instrumentation - often only drums or a lone guitar - and in her lyrics. She is intimate and uninhibited; even Cat Power fans might be uncomfortable hearing a woman banging a drum and singing in a raw, gravelly voice about alchemy and astrology, the way Niblett does on her January release The Calcination of Scout Niblett. PAIGE RICHMOND

 
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