hendrixburnsonedown.jpg
Jim Marshall
And if this had happened today, we most likely would never have seen it.

The sad news came down earlier this week that

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This Photo Not Shot During the First Three Songs. You Wouldn't See It Today

hendrixburnsonedown.jpg
Jim Marshall
And if this had happened today, we most likely would never have seen it.

The sad news came down earlier this week that legendary rock photographer Jim Marshall--the man responsible for the above, iconic photo of Jimi Hendrix--had passed. I had this photo in mind when I chatted with Graham Nash in February.

First three songs to shoot and then out, I'm assuming is the Crosby, Stills, and Nash photo policy.

Nash: It is. And the reason to that is that people don't want pictures of themselves sweaty, and disruptive during a two-hour show.

When I was looking at some of these pictures in your show -- like Hendrix burning his axe-- and these things that didn't take place during the first three songs, (I wondered) are we missing out on moments like that?

Yes, absolutely.

Three songs and out. That's that standard photo policy that gets handed down at shows 99 percent of the time.This is a bummer. Artists like Nash are also not fans of fans bringing cameras to shows because, "... they're not concentrating on the music. They're concentrating on the happening, the event of it, rather than the music."

I'd argue that this above picture of Hendrix, from the Monterey Pop Festival, is as much a critical part of the Hendrix canon, if you will, as Are You Experienced, or any of his other recording. That picture tells me more about Hendrix than any written account of that experience ever would.

It's unfortunate that we're losing these moments. But you know the solution: Tell M. Ward to shove it, and pack your camera to the show!

 
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