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Digital Leather
Sunny Day Real Estate, the Jealous Sound at the Paramount Theatre, 8 p.m., $15

Any Sunny Day Real Estate fan knows the details

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Tonight: Grizzly Bear, Sunny Day Real Estate, Digital Leather

digitalleather3.jpg
Digital Leather
Sunny Day Real Estate, the Jealous Sound at the Paramount Theatre, 8 p.m., $15

Any Sunny Day Real Estate fan knows the details already: The Seattle band that launched the '90s emo movement has reunited with its original line-up, 15 years after an acrimonious breakup. There's plenty of nostalgic appeal here, particularly for twenty-somethings that loved SDRE as teenagers but never got the chance to the see the band play live.

Grizzly Bear, the Morning Benders at the Moore, 8 p.m., $23, all ages

Brooklyn's Grizzly Bear spent last summer drawing inspiration and recording songs for the follow-up to 2006's critical smash, Yellow House, at a number of New England locales.

One of them, a miniscule island off the coast of Massachusetts called Veckatimest, became the title of the band's new album. While richly innovative art can seem cryptic, even unapproachable, the twelve chamber pop songs that emerged from these bucolic sessions are absolutely sentient and stirring thanks to an airtight instrumentation of sparkling keyboards, strummed electric guitars, swirling string arrangements and the occasional oboe or autoharp -- to say nothing of Ed Droste's piercingly pretty falsetto and the omnipresent crooning harmonies as sunny as any you'll hear on Pet Sounds. Veckatimest plays like an ocean of rolling waves, alternately swelling into action with the joyous pop choruses of "Two Weeks" and "While You Wait for the Others," then paring it down on wistful tracks like "All We Ask" and "Ready, Able." The album ends with a searing piano stunner, "Foreground," topping off what might prove to be this year's most spectacularly beautiful record. E. THOMPSON

Digital Leather, the Girls, Virgin Islands at the Comet Tavern, 9 p.m., $6

Though the name conjures something like biker techno, Digital Leather is closer to synth punk, which still fits the name rather neatly. Burping synths, ping-pong beats, and fuzz-coated choruses guide multi-instrumentalist Shawn Foree to noisy, romantic epiphanies that can't help but be infectious. Visiting the same post-Jesus And Mary Chain realm of shoegaze and goth spillover as fellow fresh faces Crocodiles and Cold Cave, Digital Leather has landed on Fat Possum's swelling lineup to release the debut album Warm Brother, following a half-live, half-studio record on the ever-hip Goner Records. Foree has also covered/remixed the Raveonettes and expanded his one-man-act into a full touring outfit, inspiring Jay Reatard to sign on as the band's manager. Before you accuse him of tapping the zeitgeist, note that Foree has been pursuing Digital Leather in one form or another since 2002. Hopefully he'll still be kicking it after the global fascination with bleary lo-fi comes to an end. DOUG WALLEN

Sunny Day Real Estate

Any Sunny Day Real Estate fan knows the details already: The Seattle band that launched the '90s emo movement has reunited with its original line-up, 15 years after an acrimonious breakup. There's plenty of nostalgic appeal here, particularly for twenty-somethings that loved SDRE as teenagers but never got the chance to the see the band play live. But there's another kind of appeal, too: the curiosity of whether four musicians who once wielded both indie and mainstream musical influence can recreate that magic. It's one thing to hear lead singer Jeremy Enigk return to his trademark scream when singing favorites from Diary and LP2; it's another to see if he can incorporate the prog rock-styled vocals of his solo work into the band's collective songwriting. During recent live shows, SDRE performed a new track, and rumors are now circulating that a new album is in the works. In 1994, SDRE created an entirely original sound--simultaneously aggressive and heartbreaking--musically recreating the sense and feeling of angst. Whatever that new album sounds like--whether it's emo or straight rock or something experimental--it will disappoint if it's anything less than explosive. PAIGE RICHMOND

 
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