prong9.jpg
Prong
Brother Ali, Evidence, Toki Wright, BK One at Neumos, 8 p.m., $15 adv, all ages

Brother Ali's fourth full-length album, Us , came out

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Tonight: Brother Ali, Aimee Mann, Tina Dico, Prong

prong9.jpg
Prong
Brother Ali, Evidence, Toki Wright, BK One at Neumos, 8 p.m., $15 adv, all ages

Brother Ali's fourth full-length album, Us, came out last month, and it's more of the same Brother Ali you've always known, except with more adventurous beats. You can read an interview with Brother Ali's longtime producer Bk-One right over here, in which Bk-One discusses his own recently-released album, from which he'll play tracks tonight. As for Us, I'm not sure if I like it better than The Undisputed Truth -- which is a really great album -- but "Slippin' Away" is a fuckin' banger, and Brother Ali's shows are always really fun.

Aimee Mann also performs at the Moore Theatre tonight for $30-$40 bucks (and it's all ages) with Nick Lowe (the guy who actually wrote "What's So Funny ('Bout Peace, Love and Understanding)" for Elvis Costello). Mann used to front the band Til Tuesday back in the eighties, but I prefer her solo stuff, which is moody and introspective without seeming whiny or self-indulgent, likely because this woman's gone through real hard times. Her 2002 album Lost in Space was a masterpiece, and while I haven't gotten into any records she's made since, she's worth checking out live if you've never seen her sing in person before.

Tina Dico, Fences at the Triple Door, 7:30 p.m., $19, all ages

At first glance, it's easy to dismiss Tina Dico as yet another blonde, soulless pop singer churned out by a big record label. But the Danish beauty actually turned down several opportunities to sign with established labels for fear of losing artistic control.

So, nine years ago, she instead opted to take out a loan and establish Finest Gramophone. Since then, Dico has achieved international success for her collaborations with English electronica duo Zero 7. And while her solo career has failed to take off outside of Europe, she's got enough of a following that she's returning to Seattle for the second time in less than a year. Dico's latest album, Count to Ten, comes off like the intimate (and slightly neurotic) ramblings of a woman writing in her diary after a breakup. And she voices her lovelorn melodies with such bruised emotion that you want to kill the guy who broke her heart. ERIKA HOBART

Prong, Soulfly, Cattle Decapitation, Mutiny Within at Showbox at the Market, 6:30 p.m., $25, all ages

Throughout their initial run from 1986 to 1997, Prong repeatedly re-defined the parameters of metal and, over the course of six landmark albums, subverted the limits of the genre in a perpetual search for fresh hybrids that sound remarkably cohesive and vital today. Originally formed by two CBGB's employees and a former Swans member, Prong's earliest material came off as little more than a quick and dirty amalgamation of thrash and hardcore. But the band's ultimate strength lay in its ability to radically reconfigure the thrash template yet still retain a definable thrash essence. Moreover, guitarist/bandleader Tommy Victor underlined nuances in the expression of angst that few headbangers have revisited since. For all their vitriol, unlike the majority of their peers, Prong never came from a place of sheer aggression. Victor's frustrations seemed driven by powerlessness instead, and the band's claustrophobic, cowed and - by Victor's own description - vulnerable music paradoxically captured the anxiety and danger of urban life without explicitly referencing the gritty environment it was borne from. Victor revived the band with all new players in 2000 and now, with a stable lineup more or less intact, verges on recapturing the fiercely enterprising spirit of the classic catalog. SABY REYES-KULKARNI

 
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