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As many are starting to hear through the grapevine, I'm producing and hosting a new metal specialty show for KEXP called "Seek and Destroy." It

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The Heavy 10: Counting Down to Seek and Destroy, Day 1

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As many are starting to hear through the grapevine, I'm producing and hosting a new metal specialty show for KEXP called "Seek and Destroy." It launches on Halloween night and will thereafter air every Saturday from midnight till 2 a.m. Needless to say, I'm thrilled this long-brewing project has gotten the green light. Seattle airwaves have been desperately in need of a quality, independent-minded metal show that gives attention to both the old and new-school across a wide variety of metal sub-genres, which is precisely what myself and co-host Tanner Ellison plan to do.

To that end, my editors here at SW have asked me to spend the next two weeks counting down my top 10 favorite metal records of all time. This, of course, is no easy task, and I'll state up front that the order will be random, not hierarchical. My first pick is after the jump (confidential to Duff McKagan and Kim Warnick: you'll both appreciate this one).

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Girlschool, Screaming Blue Murder (1982, Bronze Records; reissued on Sanctuary in 2005): Finding female-fronted metal bands that genuinely shredded was a frustrating challenge for me as a young girl. All due respect to Joan Jett and Lita Ford, the Runaways were never hard rocking enough for me, and the svengali role of creepy Kim Fowley always grossed me out. England's own Girlschool, however, had Motörhead leader Lemmy Kilmister as a genuine mentor, not an exploitive puppeteer, and the playing of nimble-fingered, lion-maned guitarist Kelly Johnson (R.I.P.) was nothing short of a revelation. The title track from this record remains a mainstay in my sets, as does "Don't Call It Love", the first song on the second side of my well-worn vinyl copy. The visuals on this clip are more than a little blurry, but the sound will definitely give you a sense of what made them special:

 
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