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The Maldives
The Maldives kick off their three-night stint in celebration of their new record, Listen to the Thunder , and the Tractor's 15th anniversary

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Live Music Roundup: Thursday, August 27

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The Maldives
The Maldives kick off their three-night stint in celebration of their new record, Listen to the Thunder, and the Tractor's 15th anniversary tonight with North Twin and Shim. Tomorrow's show features the Moondoggies and Zoe Muth (and you better get there early to see her, slackers!), while Saturday's show is more rock and roll: openers that night are Shim, Thee Emergency, and Pickwick.

Then,the Spits celebrate their CD release party tonight with the Cute Lepers and Ononos at Chop Suey. That starts at 8 p.m. and will cost $10 if you don't have a ticket yet. For more on that, check out the second half of Rocket Queen, which contains an interview with the band about the long road from juvey to a tea party with the Queen of England.

The Pretenders, Cat Power and Juliette Lewis play Marymoor tonight at 6 p.m. (no, really) for $45 or $65 (whoa). It's all ages and is not sold out yet.

Even Chrissie Hynde admits that The Pretenders has the feel of a tribute band to it, given the number of lineup changes the band's gone through. As frontwoman and the only constant member over the last three decades, Hynde essentially is The Pretenders. But ain't nothing wrong with that. The band's new album, Break Up the Concrete, contains more twang and rockabilly than their '80s material, but songs like "Boots of Chinese Plastic" and "Love's a Mystery" manage to evoke familiarity, thanks to Hynde's trademark bay. The 57-year-old sounds as ballsy now as she did a 20-something declaring her sexual prowess on "Brass in Pocket." In rock n' roll, where few aging females survive, let alone thrive, that's special. EH

The Stanley Jordan Trio kick off a 4-night stint at the Jazz Alley tonight for $23.50 (showtimes available here). It's all ages, as always.

Known for his delicate sound as much as for his trademark right-hand tapping technique, guitarist Stanley Jordan has nonetheless pushed hard against being pigeonholed throughout his 25-year career. Jordan will probably always be regarded by the general public as a virtuosic smooth-jazz guitarist, but watching him with his trio helps provide a broader context for his strong exploratory drive.

Jordan has in a sense been penalized for pulling off what so few virtuoso-level players do, which is translate prodigious skills into listenable music - while still highlighting those skills. He has applied said skills to classical, pop, Brazilian, Indian, and other styles, but his latest album, State of Nature, actually uses disharmony as a starting point. A plea for humankind to re-align with the natural world, the album also sees Jordan return to his piano roots. But don't worry - he still does the double-fisting, two-guitars-at-once thing during the show. After all these years, it still hasn't gotten old. SRK

 
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