TheBlakes_CHBP2009_072409_8235.jpg
Justin Renney
The Blakes, U.S.E., Battle Hymns at the Crocodile, 8 p.m., $5

It's fascinating to watch how an initially obvious influence on a band

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Live Music Roundup: Monday, August 3

TheBlakes_CHBP2009_072409_8235.jpg
Justin Renney
The Blakes, U.S.E., Battle Hymns at the Crocodile, 8 p.m., $5

It's fascinating to watch how an initially obvious influence on a band can slowly morph into something entirely their own. Case in point: the local boys that make up garage pop outfit the Blakes and their clear affection for the Kinks. Much like Ray and Dave Davies, brothers Snow and Garnet Keim are gifted, volatile collaborators who possess both natural musical harmony and the requisite degree of ambitious self-confidence that it takes to excel at classic pop construction. While their earlier recordings were undeniably strong outings, the 13 songs on their forthcoming sophomore full-length, Souvenir, are dramatically more original and timeless in nature, evoking that old-school Kinks sound, but with a dark streak that feels both gothic and periodically operatic. They may still be dedicated followers of fashion, but the Blakes have finally found a style all their own. HANNAH LEVIN

Trashcan Sinatras at the Triple Door, 7:30 p.m., $18, all ages

Believe it or not, the Scottish indie-pop combo Trashcan Sinatras - who formed more than 20 years ago - never broke up, though as the title of their debut 1990 single "Obscurity Knocks" augured, they've been pretty M.I.A. here in the States since the early '90s. During their early Cake/I've Seen Everything heyday, the group's melodically rich, romantic, occasionally bittersweet guitar-pop earned repeated comparisons to the Smiths, and not unfairly so - the jangly six-strings and melodramatic croons were lifted straight from the Marr/Morrissey playbook. And their tunes slotted nicely next to the refined, semi-twee likes of the Housemartins and Aztec Camera, too. The usual lineup changes and label problems, coupled with the rise of grunge, pretty much did the Trashcan Sinatras in over here, and they've gone long stretches without performing live. But 2004's unexpectedly excellent, critically acclaimed Weightlifting generated renewed interest in the band's simple pop pleasures, and they're taking another stab at success with a big tour, reissues of the back catalog, and a brand-new studio album, In the Music, from which they're certain to draw heavily this evening. MICHAEL ALAN GOLDBERG

 
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