Habib-souriantrecadre.jpg

Habib Koite and Bamada at Triple Door, 7 p.m. (all ages) and 9:30 p.m., $25

Arguably one of the most popular Malian performers in the

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Tonight's Show Suggestions

Habib-souriantrecadre.jpg

Habib Koite and Bamada at Triple Door, 7 p.m. (all ages) and 9:30 p.m., $25

Arguably one of the most popular Malian performers in the world music circuit, Habib Koité (pictured) is best known both for his guitar technique and for his calm, measured performances, which contrasts with the more fiery style of other artists from his country. A relentless touring artist who is always on the road, Koité harldly ever finds the time to get into the studio - his latest release, last year's Afriki (Cumbancha) came after a six-year hiatus - in the meantime, he found the time to collaborate with the likes of Bonnie Raitt (who is a confessed fan) and folk-blues troubadour Eric Bibb. Unlike the late Ali Farka Touré or Amadou & Mariam, Koité does not use electric guitars, relying instead on his steel-stringed acoustic, which he plays without many effects, save an occasional wah-wah or some reverb. Also, Koité bases his sound on the traditional music of his native country, adapting it in his own was - making sound as organic as it gets these days. ERNEST BARTELDES

Rachel Yamagata, Greg Laswell at The Crocodile, 8 p.m., $12

Remember Duncan Sheik? I didn't think I wanted to, given that he recorded "Barely Breathing," one of the worst/most popular singles of the late '90s. Then came Spring Awakening, the Broadway sensation that earned Sheik Grammy and Tony Awards for his orchestral skills, not to mention a coveted slot authoring The New York Times' Sunday "Playlist" on January 25. Here, he extolled the virtues of one Rachael Yamagata, a gorgeous, husky-voiced singer of a genre that can now simply be referred to as "Grey's Anatomy Soundtrack." Of Yamagata's latest release, Elephants ... Teeth Sinking Into Heart, Sheik said: "You know for a fact that there was not a single A&R or P.R. or marketing person that was in the process remotely, because there's not a single up-tempo song on the whole album. They're all completely self-indulgent, in the best possible sense of the word, indulging in the beauty of the sadness." We've had Yamagata's album in steady rotation for months now, and share Sheik's sentiments word for word. Obviously, we still remember Duncan Sheik, and for good reason. MIKE SEELY

 
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