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Phosphorescent, who plays Nectar tonight

K'naan, Gabriel Teodros, Yze, DJ Daps 1 at Neumos, 8 p.m., $10 adv, all ages

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Tonight's Show Suggestions

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Phosphorescent, who plays Nectar tonight

K'naan, Gabriel Teodros, Yze, DJ Daps 1 at Neumos, 8 p.m., $10 adv, all ages

Here is a link to Jonathan Cunningham's excellent feature on K'naan; problem is, our website is currently fubar while our web support team tinkers, so if the link doesn't function properly, please have patience with us until the thing is reborn anew. Also, if opener Yze is the young woman I'm thinking of (and I'm pretty certain she is), I've seen her spit a couple of times now, and she's really quite talented. She definitely deserves to be on this bill. I know it's tough for you music types to be punctual (myself included), but try to show up on time to check her out!

Dan Auerbach, Hacienda, Those Darlins at Showbox at the Market, 8 p.m., $22, all ages

If you haven't heard Dan Auerbach's first solo record yet, I'll save you the suspense: Yes. In most respects, Keep It Hid is almost indistinguishable from Auerbach's two-man band The Black Keys. There's no mistaking his soulful howl for anyone else's. Yet there are differences. Keep It Hid is what the Keys might sound like if Auerbach and Patrick Carney decided to add a full band behind them. (On this tour, Austin band Hacienda is backing Auerbach). And this disc is more adventurous than the Keys, incorporating a more diverse range of folk, country, and soul influences.

In other words, it moves beyond Auerbach's penchant for O.G. blues and psychedelic stoner rock. But still, Keep It Hid succeeds for the same reason the Keys do: because Auerbach mines the best in old-timey American roots music, mushing together harmonic folk ballads, blues rhythms, Doors-like organ freakouts, and fuzzy guitar solos like so much sonic Play-Doh. Instead of the ugly mess that can result from trying to do too much on a single record, Auerbach creates a balanced sound that's informed by nostalgia without drowning in it. SB

Phosphorescent, Quiet Ones at Nectar, 8 p.m., $10

Playing off of Willie Nelson's tribute to his own hero Lefty Frizell, Matthew Houck, AKA Phosphorescent, reaches deep into the Nelson archive for a homage of his own, the excellent To Willie. Though Nelson himself is in no danger of being forgotten (has a musician ever added so much to American lore?), certain of his songs are, having been inadvertently buried under the man's 70-year-old mountain of releases, which grows by at least five albums each year. The songs Houck wrestles with are Nelson's plainspoken, bottomed-out country numbers like "Reasons to Quit" (about addiction), "It's Not Supposed to Be That Way" (about infidelity), and "Too Sick to Pray" (spiritual exhaustion). Houck is successful in honoring Nelson because what To Willie does is unearth Nelson's dustier, bleaker side. The band plays as if the songs are swimming through a hangover--woozy, cracked, and slowly swingin'. Houck also deserves credit for pulling off Nelson's slippery sense of musical timing, in which solos are delivered two paces behind the rhythm section and verses take wide leaps ahead of the melodies. It's not all stark, though. When Houck delves into upbeat honky-tonkers "Pick Up the Tempo" and "I Gotta Get Drunk", the effect is like listening to a sun-baked afternoon jam, with the band grinning and nodding wearily through a thick fog of marijuana smoke. BRIAN J. BARR

Tina Dico at Triple Door, 7:30 p.m., $20, all ages

Denmark's Tina Dico might be best known internationally for her contributions to downtempo English outfit Zero 7's second album When It Falls, on which she sang lead vocals on the dreamy tracks "Home" and "The Space Between." During a 2004 tour, the band filled the Showbox with enveloping trip-hop, and Dico possessed the crowd with fellow sirens Sia Furler and Sophie Barker. Like Furler, Dico applies pitch-perfect, crystal-clear, sultry vocals to soul-bearing lyrics. And like Furler, she's adorable. But Dico has a disposition of seeming reticence and shyness that remains until she opens her cute little mouth. After that, she fills venues with her presence. A singer-songwriter at heart, Dico released her first solo album (Fuel) well before Zero 7 came knocking, and she's been recording and touring ever since. Her fifth album, A Beginning, A Detour, An Open Ending, comprises three independently recorded, different-sounding EPs in a full-length boxset. For fans of bare-bones acoustic, lush arrangements and dream pop, Dico carries herself with confidence and coveted vocal mastery. NEIL ESTEP

 
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