Souls of Mischief, "93 Til Infinity"


The Kenny Garrett Quartet, about which I blogged yesterday, has another show at Dimitriou's Jazz Alley tonight that starts

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Tonight's Show Suggestions


Souls of Mischief, "93 Til Infinity"


The Kenny Garrett Quartet, about which I blogged yesterday, has another show at Dimitriou's Jazz Alley tonight that starts at 7:30.

Souls of Mischief, Bukue One, Serendipity Project, the Rebelz, DJ Swervewon at Nectar Lounge, 9 p.m., $12

In other news, Nectar's website is still not working. What is UP with that shit?

When Souls of Mischief proclaimed themselves dope from "'93 'til infinity" sixteen years ago, they were squeaky-voiced youngsters talking a big game on a debut disc. However, that brilliantly chilled-out record held up as one of the best of the decade, and the still-intact Bay Area quartet has stayed true to its vow, remaining on the road despite not having released an album since 2000. Back in the day, the Souls dismissed other MCs as "wacker than Batman sound effects." Given the state of modern commercial hip-hop, they've probably spent their sabbatical from the studio concocting harsher analogies. A new track called "Tour Stories," featuring smooth-flowing travelogue lyrics and a vintage mellow beat from longtime producer Domino, leaked in mid-December, suggesting that 2009 might produce a new record -- and that the set list could offer some fresh material. ANDREW MILLER

Kathleen Edwards at Snoqualmie Casino, 8 p.m., $10-$20, today and tomorrow

Alt-country songbird Kathleen Edwards may not have grown up anywhere

near country music's American mecca, but who says a Canadian girl can't

fall in love with pedal steel, Whiskeytown, and Dylan? So far, no one's

questioned the legitimacy of Edwards' adopted all-American style; in

fact, American media outlets from Rolling Stone to NPR have been gobbling up her sumptuous story-songs with gusto since her 2003 debut Failer. On her latest album, Asking for Flowers,

Edwards invokes '60s protest folk with politically driven songs like

"Oil Man's War" and "Oh Canada," where getting the moral across is more

important than the storytelling. But when she chooses to create a

persona rather than take a position, the results--"Run" and "Alicia

Ross" being good examples--feel infinitely more genuine. If only these shows weren't on a weeknight... SARA BRICKNER

 
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