Here are the Moondoggies on the ferry.

Of these three options, I have to recommend tonight's benefit shindig at the Sunset above all others. The

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Tonight's Beneficial Show Suggestions

Here are the Moondoggies on the ferry.

Of these three options, I have to recommend tonight's benefit shindig at the Sunset above all others. The Moondoggies, the Maldives, Grand Hallway, the Final Spins and Andy Fitts are all playing to help raise money for Jamie Speiss of Husbands, Love Your Wives, who's been saddled with some huge, looming medical bills. You can read more here. It starts at 8 p.m. and there is a minimum donation of $8. For this, you get a free Husbands, Love Your Wives demo. Yay!

And then there are these shows:

O' Death, Hillstomp, Gravelroad at High Dive, 9 p.m., $8

Michael Alan Goldberg on O'Death:

If you can possibly imagine the Pixies plucked from the Boston club circuit circa 1987's Come on Pilgrim and dropped into a dilapidated shack in the Appalachians with only some banjos, fiddles, trombones, and makeshift percussion to make music with, then you have a pretty good idea of what to expect when Brooklyn sextet O'Death comes to town. Frontman Greg Jamie possesses a similar kind of unhinged, reedy voice and penchant for oddball lyrics as Black Francis, and there's a quirky, creepy-cool quality to the band's tunes, which merge old-timey mountain sounds with raucous Balkan-style folk-punk and swaying chamber pop. Fittingly, O'Death does a kickass cover of the Pixies' "Nimrod's Son," which is sure to be a crowd pleaser, but chances are good you'll go mad for most of the songs on their excellent, just-released Broken Hymns, Limbs and Skin.

Kathleen Edwards, John Doe at Tractor Tavern, 8 p.m., $23

Alt-country songbird Kathleen Edwards may not have grown up anywhere near country music’s American mecca, but who says a Canadian girl can’t fall in love with pedal steel, Whiskeytown, and Dylan? So far, no one’s questioned the legitimacy of Edwards’ adopted all-American style; in fact, American media outlets from Rolling Stone to NPR have been gobbling up her sumptuous story-songs with gusto since her 2003 debut Failer. On her latest album, Asking for Flowers, Edwards invokes ’60s protest folk with politically driven songs like “Oil Man’s War” and “Oh Canada,” where getting the moral across is more important than the storytelling. But when she chooses to create a persona rather than take a position, the results—“Run” and “Alicia Ross” being good examples—feel infinitely more genuine.

 
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