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Sara Bareilles

Sara Bareilles, Marc Broussard, Raining Jane, Moore Theatre, 8 p.m., $29-$35, all ages

Frank Paiva on Sara Bareilles:

Sara Bareilles’ current single, “Bottle

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Mmmmm. Delicious Show Suggestions

081015_wire_wed_BareillesWEB.jpg

Sara Bareilles

Sara Bareilles, Marc Broussard, Raining Jane, Moore Theatre, 8 p.m., $29-$35, all ages

Frank Paiva on Sara Bareilles:

Sara Bareilles’ current single, “Bottle It Up,” opens with the line, “There’ll be girls across the nation that will eat this up.” And she knows the music biz is presently marketing two categories of young female singers: Sexy playthings like Rihanna or Ciara, and earthy chanteuses like Corinne Bailey Rae or Colbie Caillat. Without falling into either camp, Bareilles sounds like the next logical step forward, which is probably why her 2007 debut, Little Voice, has sold more than 800,000 copies. Her melodies are catchy, but also undeniably complicated and mature. Onstage she’s charming and youthful, but her material has an old-soul feel. Sometimes compared—wrongly, I think—to Fiona Apple, Bareilles tackles fraught topics like love with a fresh, undeniably West Coast sensibility. There are none of Apple’s moody bathtub ruminations to be found. I recently caught Bareilles’ show in New York (on her first tour as a headliner), and there’s no doubt she’s become a seasoned live performer. A note to fans who’ve worn out Little Voice: Bareilles has avoided the trap of touring with only one album by adding some intriguing new covers. Finally, to settle all discussion, her last name is pronounced “bar-ell-is.”

The Builders and the Butchers, Neumos, 8 p.m., $10 adv

I wrote this a while back:

Whether the Builders and the Butchers are regaling their audiences with eerie tales of the gallows, coal-mining accidents, or the various other methods by which people have expired over the years, the macabre pop-gospel balladeers' energetic, upbeat melodies defy the sorrowful tales of general bloodshed that accompany them. Between the cheery banjo stylings, vocalist Ryan Sollee's twangy warblings, and the gritty lo-fi recording quality that pervades most of their tracks, the Portland band's bluegrass inclinations dominate. At times, Sollee sounds like he could be Colin Meloy's little brother, with accordion and mandolin to drive home the sea-chantey effect that earned the Decemberists their popularity; at other moments, the music swells with a psychedelic riff, and you could swear you were listening to one of Led Zeppelin's lesser-known blues tracks.

Watain, Book Of Black Earth, Ceremonial Castings, Slut Vomit (?!), Zoroaster, Studio Seven, 7 p.m., $18, all ages

Andrew Miller on this creepy-ass Satanic metal band:

Watain "crawled out of Satan's cunt in 1998" according to its official biography, and the Swedish group has been conducting a yearlong celebration of its tenth anniversary. However, its set decorations probably won't include birthday cakes and party hats. Watain's previous U.S. appearances incorporated animal cadavers (skinless pig heads, rats hung on inverted crosses) into the stage show, dismaying many venue owners, who received no prior notification. These macabre surprises "led to some rather nasty dialogues and confrontations," singer Erik Danielsson explains in the October issue of Metal Maniacs, "but in the end, as we all know, the devil always wins." As for the malodorous presence of porcine blood, with which Danielsson baptizes band members and fans, Watain explains "you should not only see and hear but also smell the abomination that is true black metal." Watain concerts aren't just about rancid fluids, corpse paint and bursts of hellfire, though those elements confirm an uncommon devotion to black-metal/magic aesthetics. The band's music stands as an equally convincing testimony to its Satanic convictions, with slithery vocals, maliciously entrancing dual-guitar harmonies and unrelenting drums contributing to a genuinely unnerving ambience.

 
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