GUTTERTWINS_13.jpg

Gutter Twins in New York City. Photo by Michael Alan Goldberg

From this week's Short List:

The Gutter Twins, Great Northern

Showbox at the Market,

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Live Music Tonight: Gutter Twins, British Sea Power, and More

GUTTERTWINS_13.jpg

Gutter Twins in New York City. Photo by Michael Alan Goldberg

From this week's Short List:

The Gutter Twins, Great Northern

Showbox at the Market, $17, 8:00pm

Hmmm. Not the group I would expect to open for the Gutter Twins, a dark and gritty band featuring Mark Lanegan and Greg Dulli, two of modern rock's greatest heathens. But whatever! Great Northern (I hope the name is a Twin Peaks reference, but I'm not sure) are not from any great north at all, but rather they're from Los Angeles (which, actually, is north if you live in Mexico). Their tunes are light and breezy indie pop and would flow quite well on an iPod shuffle consisting of Twilight Sleep, Sea Wolf, and Silversun Pickups. In other words, they make very pretty music that will serve as a nice contrast to the gruffness of headliners Lanegan and Dulli.

Read Michael Alan Goldberg's review of The Gutter Twins' show in New York City.

British Sea Power, Colourmusic

Neumo's, 8 p.m. $12 adv.

Never have I eaten my words as quickly as when our Travis Ritter announced British Sea Power's new album (Do You Like Rock Music?) and I dissed and dismissed it, only to hear one of the songs on the radio 10 minutes later and fall in love. The third album by this Brighton-based band stands out among the oatmeal (to steal a phrase from Dlisted.com's Michael K) that I find most current British pop to be. It was recorded in Montreal, the Czech Republic, and a 19th-century fortification in Cornwall, and on it the foursome's epic guitars and multiple obsessions—from Sodom to Polish plumbers to Hedy Lamarr—meet with smart melodies to make a satisfying package of songs. "It's about cherry wood and Kevlar—the good and the bad," said BSP guitarist Martin Noble. Addressing cultural anxiety with optimism, and doing it well.

Liam Finn

free, sold out, 6:00pm

He's the next generation of Kiwi pop royalty, heir to the considerable legacy his father Neil and Uncle Tim established over three decades through Split Enz, Crowded House, brotherly collaborations, and solo work. At the tender age of 24, he's already a music veteran, playing onstage with his dad for 10 years and fronting his own band, Betchadupa. He's here solo for the first time, supporting his debut, I'll Be Lightning, whose 14 tracks confirm that he's inherited the family gift for writing yearning, emotional pop, bittersweet and offbeat both musically and lyrically, with otherworldly (other side of the world?) melodies and harmonies, and hooks that move into your head and take up residence. It's a true solo effort—he wrote the music, played nearly every instrument (including theremin!), and recorded, produced, and mixed it himself, going all-analog for a warm yet raw, unpolished sound. Live, he dashes back and forth between guitar and drums and makes extensive use of guitar and bass loops. And he'll kick out the jams—just ask Eddie Vedder, with whom he's shared a stage or two. Catch him at small venues while you can.

The Builders and the Butchers, guests

Sunset Tavern, $7, 9:00pm

Whether the Builders and the Butchers are regaling their audiences with eerie tales of the gallows, coal-mining accidents, or the various other methods by which people have expired, the macabre pop-gospel balladeers' energetic, upbeat melodies defy the sorrowful tales of general bloodshed that accompany them. Between the cheery banjo stylings, vocalist Ryan Sollee's twangy warblings, and the gritty lo-fi recording quality that pervades most of their tracks, the Portland band's bluegrass inclinations dominate. At times, Sollee sounds like he could be Colin Meloy's little brother, with accordion and mandolin to drive home the sea-chantey effect that earned the Decemberists their popularity; at other moments, the music swells with a psychedelic riff, and you could swear you were listening to one of Led Zeppelin's lesser-known blues tracks. Don't be surprised if the band hops off stage and leads a raucous musical procession around the venue.

 
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