Rubin.jpg

 

Can that bearded rich man save the music business? That's the question Lynn Hirschberg raises in this Sunday's New York Times Sunday Magazine .

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Savior Rick Rubin?

Can he save the music business?

Rubin.jpg

 

Can that bearded rich man save the music business? That's the question Lynn Hirschberg raises in this Sunday's New York Times Sunday Magazine. In her profile of Rick Rubin and his new role as co-chair of Columbia Records, several interesting points are brought up, namely that most record companies have been more concerned with how to sell music, rather than how to make great art. But Rubin (who is responsible for Def Jam records, American Records, the careers of LL Cool J, the Beastie Boys, Red Hot Chili Peppers' mainstream success, and Johnny Cash's final creative peak), was quoted in the piece with a statement that is so fucking obvious, but could ultimately change the course of the music business for major labels, if they pay attention to him.

Quoth Rubin: "The most important thing we have to do now is get the art right. So many of the decisions at these companies have not been about the music. They sign artists for the wrong reasons...because they think somebody else wants them or if they need to have a record out by a certain date. That old way of doing things is obsolete, but luckily, fear is making the record companies less arrogant. So, what's important is to find music that's timeless. I still believe that if an artist gains the belief of the listener, then anything is possible."

Whew! You're a breath of fresh air, Rick! Breath of fresh air...

 
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