ravonettes #1.jpg
(Photos by Renee McMahon. Click here to see a slide show of more photos .)
 

Who: The Raveonettes, Midnight Movies
When: Tuesday
Where: The


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The Raveonettes Serve Up Psycho-Surf Rock at Triple Door

The Danish duo melds Buddy Holly and Sonic Youth at The Triple Door, Tuesday.

ravonettes #1.jpg
(Photos by Renee McMahon. Click here to see a slide show of more photos.)
 

Who: The Raveonettes, Midnight Movies
When: Tuesday
Where: The Triple Door Main Stage
What: New Wave meets ‘60s Surf Rock

If John Hughes was still making teen dramedies and he needed a band to play during the prom scene, The Raveonettes would be perfect. It helps that Sune Rose Wagner looks like Tim Burton circa 1985 and Sharin Foo is a six-foot-tall reincarnation of Debbie Harry but it’s the music, first, that would land them that gig.

They kicked off their Triple Door set with Buddy Holly’s “Everyday.” The harmonized vocals were straight out of 1955 and spot-on while the instrumental interpretation was culled from the ‘80s.

Wagner stuck to his guitar and vocals but Foo switched from guitar to bass to the two-piece drum kit. She even just sang on a couple tunes. There’s a smoldering sensuality to a woman who looks and sounds like she does singing with a glass of red wine in her hand. That seductiveness came out in Wagner’s vocals, also. When Wagner and Foo sang into the same mic, it looked like they might start making out right there; when singing into separate mics, it was easy to feel like either singer might make out with anyone in the audience.

The highlight of the set for much of the crowd was a cover of Sonic Youth’s “100%,” but the slower songs went over well, too. The Raveonettes are the perfect band for an “or school is so much hipper than yours” prom.

Opener Midnight Movies did a great job of warming up the crowd. Band members switched instruments with ease and, at one point, to the audience’s surprise. If anyone is looking to do a Jethro Tull tribute album, Midnight Movies is the band to have. The played a rendition of “Knights in White Satin,” flute and all. Plus, it was sung in French. If The Raveonettes combined ‘60s and ‘80s, then Midnight Movies bridged the gap between the ‘70s and the ‘90s with their pre-glam acid trip and Smashing Pumpkins guitars.

Too bad there was no room to dance.  

 
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