A&Y.jpg

Photo by Greg Lutze

In addition to Rocky, Trucks, Glaser and the Mahler Festival, Brian and I are recommending two other shows of the live

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Also Tonight!

Live music, shows!

A&Y.jpg

Photo by Greg Lutze

In addition to Rocky, Trucks, Glaser and the Mahler Festival, Brian and I are recommending two other shows of the live variety tonight:

At the Croc Arthur & Yu with A Sunny Day in Glasgow!

From this week's Short List:

Arthur & Yu (CD release), A Sunny Day in Glasgow, My Teenage Stride

Break out the video camera, the champagne, and the condoms because tonight is a celebration of firsts. Headliners Arthur & Yu, a local duo whose sound goes down easy with spoonfuls of the Velvets, Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazlewood, celebrate their debut release, In Camera. It’s the first record out of the gate for Sub Pop offshoot Hardly Art and, with much blogosphere buzz already, should prove a sturdy base for the young label. A Sunny Day in Glasgow, the Philly-based band of King Kong Ding Dong’s Ben Daniels and his twin sisters, make their first stop in Seattle to showcase material from their initial effort together, the atmospheric Scribble Mural Comic Journal, along with a special tour-only CD. Crocodile Cafe, 9 p.m. $9. AJA PECKNOLD

And sometime Seattleite, sometime Parisian Terry Lee Hale will be taking the stage at Jules Maes:

Terry Lee Hale, Rusty Willoughby, Jared Clifton

It’s always surprised me that Terry Lee Hale and Wim Wenders never hooked up. Wenders is a sucker for the kind of big-sky Americana that Hale creates. Like Ry Cooder’s soundtrack for Wenders’ classic film Paris, Texas, Hale’s music is chilling and alluring in the way a desolate desert highway is. Though he seems to be best known for his song “Dead Is Dead,” which was included on Bruce Pavitt’s landmark Sub Pop 200 compilation, he has continued to craft albums that approach the sparse, west Texas vibe of Alejandro Escovedo, but with fewer cover songs and more moody instrumentals. Though he still keeps a home here in Seattle, he’s lived mostly in Paris since the early ’90s. But he’s like Neko Case, in that no matter how far he strays, we still call him our own. Jules Maes Saloon, 9 p.m. BRIAN J. BARR

 

 

 
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