AMERICAN_IDOL.jpg When the popular Fox program American Idol came to Seattle last September, American Idol judge Simon Cowell summed up the first day of the 9,000

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Sea-Idol

American Idol in Seattle

AMERICAN_IDOL.jpg When the popular Fox program American Idol came to Seattle last September, American Idol judge Simon Cowell summed up the first day of the 9,000 hopeful singers who tried out in two words: “absolutely atrocious”. Because of this, I had to see how bad the singers were. The first couple weeks of episodes spend more time highlighting the rejects than those who will actually make it on, but I tuned in midway through the two-hour episode, to see those familiar faces - Cowell, and fellow judges Paula Abdul and Randy Jackson, turn down one person after another. I figure that half of those who tried out and landed a few precious minutes on television were only there to sabotage their performance, and push the judge’s buttons. The rest were totally serious (or so the producers of the show lead us on to believe), like the twenty-seven year old computer geek who nervously sang a flaccid, out of tune “Unchained Melody,” or twenty-three year old Kenneth from Bothell, and pal Jonathan from Renton, who really believed they had a chance. I almost felt bad for them. The show concluded with a montage of the rejects we saw earlier singing Pussycat Dolls “Don’t Cha.” For a city filled with “absolutely atrocious” singers, something host Ryan Seacrest said would never bring the show back to our fair city, the producers of American Idol sure as hell did everything in their power to exploit the disillusioned (and perhaps mentally imbalanced) contestants before they left. That’s what I call absolutely atrocious.

 
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