Kim Wyman

Washington Secretary of State, Again, Slaps Down Trump’s Voter Fraud Claims

Kim Wyman, a Republican, also rebuked Trump during the election.

Back when even Donald Trump seemed to think Donald Trump was going to lose the presidential election, he made it pretty clear that he planned to blame the results on voter fraud.

Kim Wyman, Washington’s Republican Secretary of State, was none too pleased with his rhetoric.

“In recent days, we have heard heated campaign rhetoric about American elections being ‘rigged’ and somehow predetermined. This kind of baseless accusation is irresponsible and threatens to undermine voter confidence on this most basic foundation of democracy,” Wyman said in a press release last October. As we reported, Wyman’s remarks were just one of two serious rebukes local Republicans delivered to Trump that week (not that it mattered, of course.)

Now, bizarrely, Trump is doubling down on his “it-was-rigged” rhetoric, promising a major investigation on possible voter fraud. By Trump’s unsubstantiated reckoning, he would have won the popular vote—which he in fact lost by 3 million—were it not for illegal immigrants casting ballots.

And once again, Wyman is firing back. She sent out this statement today:

“As Secretary of State, I take any allegations of voter fraud seriously and am eager to review any evidence President Trump has, or his investigation might uncover, to support his assertion. However, as I stated when he raised this issue last fall, I am confident the election system in Washington state is secure and prevents illegal voting. Our county elections offices and our State Elections Division have multiple safeguards in place to prevent illegal voting, and there is no evidence that illegal voting took place anywhere in our state during the 2016 election.”

While Trump’s assertions don’t seem to have any merit, the New York Times notes that they could help lay the ground work for stricter voter ID laws, which civil rights groups have long argued are really just an excuse to disenfranchise poor people.

More in News & Comment

Most of the tenants at show cause hearings have fallen behind on rent, said Housing Justice Project Managing Attorney Edmund Witter. Photo by Melissa Hellmann
New Report Details Seattle’s Eviction Trends

Analysis of 2017 county records and interviews show that nearly 90 percent of evicted tenants experienced homelessness

Daron Morris Suspends Campaign for King County Prosecutor

After running as a reformer, Morris says medical reasons are preventing him from finishing the race.

Democratic incumbent Rep. Adam Smith of Washington’s 9th Congressional District (right) and challenger Sarah Smith discuss the issues facing the district during a forum the Mirror hosted on Sept. 19. Andy Hobbs/staff photo
Smith vs. Smith: Two Democrats Clash in 9th Congressional District Forum

Democratic socialist Sarah Smith seeks ‘bold new progressive vision’ in bid to replace incumbent Adam Smith.

Teen Immigrants in Washington Programs Claim Sexual Assault and Rape

Police reports from federally-funded facilities in Renton and Fife call the minors’ safety into question.

It’s Official: Safeco Field Will Get $135 Million in Taxpayer Funds

Critical King County Councilmembers call plan “a fleecing” and “irresponsible.”

The Westin Seattle workers represented by Unite Here Local 8 gather at Gethsemane Lutheran Church after voting to strike on Sep. 14. Photo by Abby Lawlor
Hotel Workers Vote to Authorize Strike

The Westin Seattle employees will picket to demand higher wages from Marriott International.

King County Moves to Expand Pre-Booking Diversion Program

Three cities could get money to link low-level drug offenders to services and keep them out of jail.

Immigrant Youth Vulnerable to Abuse in Centers

Federally-funded facilities struggle to maintain health and safety of minors stuck in limbo

Most Read