Olympia Protesters Block Fracking Train

They refuse to speak with reporters beyond a pre-written statement.

A small encampment of protesters have blocked the railroad tracks in Olympia. They say they’re working in solidarity with the Standing Rock protesters in North Dakota. According to a press release the protesters sent to The Olympian, they go by the name Olympia Stand and already successfully blocked a train carrying fracking sand on Friday.

When we visited the encampment on Sunday, we tried to find out more about it, but an unnamed person speaking on behalf of the group refused to answer any questions, telling the other campers, “From here on out, please tell everyone, the decided upon way that we’re dealing with press: no individuals talk to the press, no names are given to the press. We’re giving away this statement to all press people.”

Here’s the statement:

“We are here to stand in solidarity with Standing Rock as a response to their call for support as the indigenous people there are being terrorized by police on a daily basis, as well as to protest centuries of neocolonialism and environmental racism. Furthermore, our goal is to stop the transportation of more fracking materials to North Dakota. Come join us.”

The protest camp is located at Jefferson and 7th, near the Capitol Building. You can bus from Seattle to Olympia for $5.50.

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