Lawyer In Murray Lawsuit Hit With $5,000 Fine

A judge today ruled that Lincoln Beauregard is abusing the courts for publicity.

In this week’s issue, we wrote about attorney Lincoln Beauregard, noting that not everyone appreciated his tactics in his client’s sex abuse lawsuit against Mayor Ed Murray.

You can now count Superior Court Judge Veronica Alicea-Galvan among those of that opinion. On Thursday she slapped Beauregard with a $5,000 fine for what she said was inappropriate court filings in the case. Murray’s attorneys have contended that Beauregard has filed outlandish or otherwise sensational accusations with the court as a way to drum up negative press for Murray. Among other things, they cited the filing of an unattributed report of a police cover-up at Murray’s house last year, in which a naked man supposedly had to be admitted into Murray’s home to get his clothes back. The anonymous report also suggested Murray was drunk.

Then there was this photo, of himself with another man accusing Murray of sexual abuse, which he filed earlier this week:

 photo 39e30ed0-2fc3-11e7-bde2-bbf97fa8a3c4_zpslqutda1f.jpg

Beauregard has defended himself against the accusations, saying that he’s simply trying to ferret out the truth about Murray’s behavior.

In a statement, Murray’s personal spokesman cheered Beauregard getting his comeuppance.

“We’ve said all along that opposing counsel seems more intent on trying his case in the court of public opinion than in a court of law, and today the judge agreed with us,” Jeff Reading said. “Clearly, the judge was disturbed by opposing counsel’s antics, and is taking the rare but serious step of sanctioning him. Mayor Murray deserves a right to due process, and it is our hope that the court’s actions today will prevent opposing counsel from further undermining this basic right.”

Beauregard told the Seattle Times he planned to appeal the ruling.

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