President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference, Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017, in the East Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Judge Considers Jailed Immigrant’s Plea for a Day in Court

Daniel Ramirez’s petition for habeas corpus may set a precedent for Trump’s deportations.

Friday morning, a federal judge in Seattle will decide the immediate fate of Daniel Ramirez Medina, a 23 year old undocumented immigrant whom federal police arrested last week even though he was granted a two year work permit by the Obama administration last year.

Ramirez, currently under lock and key at a federal detention facility in Tacoma, is a young father who was brought to the U.S. illicitly by his parents from Mexico when he was seven years old, according to the lawsuit filed by his lawyer (hat tip to SCC Insight). A spokesperson for federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) says that Ramirez admitted to being a gangmember, according to Reuters. The accusation against Ramirez echoes President Trump’s campaign rhetoric, in which he promised to cleanse America of “bad hombres.” Ramirez’s lawyer says Ramirez “unequivocally denies” gang membership, and says federal agents pressured him to make a false confession. According to the lawsuit, Ramirez has no criminal record.

The case may set a precedent for how much discretion Trump has over deporting people. Ramirez is cleared to continue working in the U.S. under former President Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Under DACA, people who were brought to the U.S. illicitly as children and who can demonstrate that they are not a national security or public safety risk can apply for deferred prosecution for two years at a time. To apply for DACA, of course, undocumented immigrants have to identify themselves to the federal government in the first place, so now the Trump administration has a list of admitted undocumented immigrants. If the judge finds that Trump can deport Ramirez without any judicial review, it will mean that other DACA applicants are also at risk. The Department of Homeland Security says that it has already detained hundreds of immigrants, according to Democracy Now.

Before the hearing, immigrant advocates (including Indian immigrant and city councilmember Kshama Sawant) will rally at the federal courthouse. The rally begins at 9 a.m.

More in News & Comment

Hundreds of teachers rally outside of John Stanford Center for Educational Excellence to ask for raises in the upcoming contract with Seattle Public Schools. Photo by Melissa Hellmann
Is a Strike Looming at Seattle Public Schools?

Some educators say they’re ready to stall negotiations to demand competitive wages.

Race For King County Prosecutor Heats Up at Seattle Forum

Former public defender Daron Morris slams incumbent Dan Satterberg for the use of bail in the county justice system

Democratic Socialist to Run Against Rep. Adam Smith in Nov. Election

After coming up short in early results for Aug. 7 primary, Sarah Smith moves into second place

Sparks Continue to Fly Over Safeco Field Maintenance Funding

PFD board member argues that $180 million in public money for stadium upkeep lets Mariners off the hook.

Photo courtesy of The Herald
Death Watch For Killer Whales?

Grieving mother orca shines a spotlight on a serious ecological issue.

Photo by Josh Kelety
City Council Passes Temporary Historic Protection for The Showbox

With a lively crowd on hand, the Council unanimously voted to delay any demolition of the venue by 10 months.

Carmen Best was confirmed as the Seattle Police Chief on Aug. 13. Photo courtesy of the Seattle Police Department.
There’s a New Police Chief In Town

Seattle City Council Confirms Carmen Best as the Chief of the Seattle Police Department

The Roundup: White supremacy, teacher salaries and a homemade bomb

• Over 100 people rallied outside the Crossroads Bellevue shopping center on… Continue reading

Developmental Disabilities Administration employees take a break during the workday to advocate for higher pay and affordable health insurance on August 9, 2018. Photo by Melissa Hellmann
State Employees Can’t Afford Seattle

As the cost of living booms, case managers in contract negotiations cite low wages for high turnover rates.

Most Read