President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference, Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017, in the East Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Judge Considers Jailed Immigrant’s Plea for a Day in Court

Daniel Ramirez’s petition for habeas corpus may set a precedent for Trump’s deportations.

Friday morning, a federal judge in Seattle will decide the immediate fate of Daniel Ramirez Medina, a 23 year old undocumented immigrant whom federal police arrested last week even though he was granted a two year work permit by the Obama administration last year.

Ramirez, currently under lock and key at a federal detention facility in Tacoma, is a young father who was brought to the U.S. illicitly by his parents from Mexico when he was seven years old, according to the lawsuit filed by his lawyer (hat tip to SCC Insight). A spokesperson for federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) says that Ramirez admitted to being a gangmember, according to Reuters. The accusation against Ramirez echoes President Trump’s campaign rhetoric, in which he promised to cleanse America of “bad hombres.” Ramirez’s lawyer says Ramirez “unequivocally denies” gang membership, and says federal agents pressured him to make a false confession. According to the lawsuit, Ramirez has no criminal record.

The case may set a precedent for how much discretion Trump has over deporting people. Ramirez is cleared to continue working in the U.S. under former President Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Under DACA, people who were brought to the U.S. illicitly as children and who can demonstrate that they are not a national security or public safety risk can apply for deferred prosecution for two years at a time. To apply for DACA, of course, undocumented immigrants have to identify themselves to the federal government in the first place, so now the Trump administration has a list of admitted undocumented immigrants. If the judge finds that Trump can deport Ramirez without any judicial review, it will mean that other DACA applicants are also at risk. The Department of Homeland Security says that it has already detained hundreds of immigrants, according to Democracy Now.

Before the hearing, immigrant advocates (including Indian immigrant and city councilmember Kshama Sawant) will rally at the federal courthouse. The rally begins at 9 a.m.

More in News & Comment

Citizens gather for an interfaith candlelight vigil Nov. 1 at the Snohomish County Courthouse to honor the 11 victims of an attack at a Pittsburgh synagogue. Photo courtesy of The Herald.
Issaquah Company Hosts Gab, Social Media Favorite of the Far-Right

Website was pulled by GoDaddy after Pittsburgh synagogue shooting.

The team that advocated for I-1631 at downtown Seattle’s Arctic Club on Nov. 6, 2018. Photo by Melissa Hellmann
Washington Rejects Carbon Fee

Campaign organizers say they will continue pushing for a cleaner future.

The race for Washington’s 8th Congressional District is between Kim Schrier (D) and Dino Rossi (R). File photo
Schrier Leads Rossi in Hotly-Contested 8th Congressional District

Candidates compete for seat vacated by Republican Dave Reichert

The race for Washington’s 9th Congressional District is between two Democrats, incumbent Adam Smith (left) and political newcomer Sarah Smith. File photo
Congressman Adam Smith Leads Re-Election Bid for WA’s 9th District

The district spans from Bellevue and south Seattle down through Renton, Tukwila, Kent, Federal Way and Tacoma

Anita Khandelwal
Anita Khandelwal to Lead Department of Public Defense

While the King County Council eventually approved her appointment to the position with an 8-1 vote, Khandelwal’s path to the position was rocky.

Tacoma’s Northwest Detention Center is run by Florida-based GEO Group. Photo by Melissa Hellmann
Did ICE Retaliate Against a Detainee Over Seattle Weekly Report?

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement denies accusation

Safeco Field Funding Referendum Withdrawn

The mysterious backers of the initiative won’t say why, but some think it’s because they couldn’t get funding to gather the necessary signatures.

Most Read