M. Lorena González speaks beside Mayor Ed Murray in January in response to the Trump administration’s first travel ban. Photo via González

Lorena González Will Not Be Running for Mayor

The first-term councilmember considered throwing her hat into the wide-open mayor’s race, but won’t.

This morning, Seattle City Councilmember M. Lorena González announced via press release that she will not run for mayor of Seattle. The announcement comes about a week after rumors surfaced that she was considering a run, and just a couple days before Friday’s deadline for candidates to formally file candidacy.

“After speaking with my family and much consideration, I have decided to not enter the Seattle Mayor’s race in 2017,” said González in the release. “While being the Mayor of Seattle would be an incredible honor, I remain focused on the work we have yet to accomplish on the Seattle City Council.

“Over the next four years, I am uniquely positioned to continue protecting our immigrant and refugee families and championing paid family and medical leave, police reform and housing affordability. I am humbled [by calls to run for mayor]…but I instead will redouble my efforts on the Seattle City Council as a citywide representative in Position 9.”

The fact that González will not run has significant implications for the fall race. There are nine candidates, many of them credible, running for Position 8, the only other city-wide seat on the council. It is currently held by Tim Burgess, who will retire from council after this year. Had González, who does not face any particularly imposing challengers, jumped from running for reelection in Position 9 to the mayor’s race, she would almost certainly have precipitated more jumps, particularly from Position 8 candidates into the Position 9 race for González’s seat.

But all those possibilities are now moot, because González isn’t running for mayor. It’s a strategically sound decision: she’s unlikely to face significant opposition in her race for reelection to Position 9, while the sheer number of candidates running for mayor would make her own mayoral candidacy (and anyone else’s) a crapshoot. And, of course, any time a candidate magnanimously refuses a proferred crown is a good time to brush up on your Shakespeare.

cjaywork@seattleweekly.com

More in News & Comment

Hidden River Farms is 100 acres of farmland in Grays Harbor County. Photo by Lucia Wyss
Sowing the Seeds of Mental Health

Suicide is an epidemic amongst agricultural workers, but young farmers and state legislators are working to find solutions.

Seattle and King County Officials Want a Safe Injection Van

The mobile project—an alternative to permanent sites—still doesn’t have a defined timeline.

Western Washington Could See More Wildfires This Year

Lots of grass and warmer weather could make for worsening fire seasons.

An autopsy found that Tommy Le was shot twice in the back during an fatal encounter with a King County sheriff’s deputy. Photo courtesy Career Link
New Report Calls for Increased Transparency From King County Sheriff’s Office

The fatal shooting of Tommy Le served as a case study for researchers.

Charles Pillon sits inside one of the several buses on Iron Mountain. Photo by Caean Couto
The Last Days of Iron Mountain?

After battling King County government for decades, Charles Pillon may have finally lost the fight over his illegal 10-acre junkyard.

The public files into the City Council Chambers to voice their opinions prior to the vote to repeal the head tax. Photo by Melissa Hellmann
Head Tax Repealed By Seattle City Council

After pressure from big businesses, city leaders cave on their plan to fund homeless services.

A scene from the 2017 Women’s March Seattle. Photo by Richard Ha/Flickr
County Sexual Harassment Policies Could Be Overhauled

One King County councilmember says male-dominated departments have “workplace culture issues.”

The Firs Homeowners Association celebrate outside of the Maleng Regional Justice Center after a ruling that buys them more time in their homes on June 7, 2018. Photo by Melissa Hellmann
SeaTac Mobile Home Owners Granted Stay From Eviction

The ruling allows about 200 residents more time in their homes, as they attempt to acquire the property.

Most Read