Former U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan to Jump Into Mayor’s Race

Seattle Councilmember M. Lorena González is rumored to also be planning to run.

Former U.S. attorney Jenny Durkan will formally announce her candidacy for mayor of Seattle tomorrow morning, according to a press release from her campaign. Seattle City Councilmember M. Lorena González may also jump into the race soon, according to reporter Erica C. Barnett:

Called for confirmation Thursday morning, González office staff said they did not know whether she is running.

Durkan, the first openly gay U.S. attorney, was appointed by President Obama to head the Western District of Washington from 2009 through 2014. During that time, she distinguished herself in part by cracking down on crime “hotspots” in White Center; she also “played a significant role” in causing the Department of Justice investigation of Seattle Police that led to the city’s current police reform consent decree, according to The Seattle Times. When Attorney General Eric Holder stepped down in 2014, she was on the Obama administration’s shortlist of possible replacements, but lost out to Loretta Lynch.

González, the daughter of undocumented Mexican immigrants, made a name for herself as a lawyer who sued Seattle Police after one of their officers brutalized and threatened to “knock the Mexican piss” out of an arrestee. She went on to work in current Mayor Ed Murray’s office as legal council, then in 2015 won her current seat on the City Council.

Murray announced earlier this week that he will not run for reelection due to sex abuse allegations (he denies the allegations). More than a dozen candidates are registered or expected to run in this autumn’s mayoral race, including attorney and activist Nikkita Oliver, urban planner Cary Moon, former mayor Mike McGinn, and state senator Bob Hasegawa.

cjaywork@seattleweekly.com

More in News & Comment

Ruling in Seattle Is Likely to Reunite Many Refugee Families

The U.S. District Court decision brings back a process that has helped approximately 2,500 families each year.

Westin Hotel workers hold up signs in support of housekeepers’ rights. Photo by Hannah Long-Higgins
The Office of Labor Standards Sets Plan for Implementation of the Hotel Worker Law

It has been more than a year since the law was approved by voters.

Photo by Visitor7/Wikimedia
State Legislature
Washington Renters’ Protections May Be On the Way

New legislation could make it harder for tenants to be evicted.

While the new Navigation Center is the recommended choice of the Navigation Team, it’s unclear how effective their efforts have been. File photo
Should the City Expand Its Homeless Outreach?

The Navigation Team was created to ease the impact of encampment clean-ups, but its growth is on hold as some question its effectiveness.

The Post Exchange and Gymnasium building is one of many structures remaining from Fort Lawton’s past. Photo by Wonderlane/Flickr
As Plans for Fort Lawton Move Forward, a New School Appears Less Likely

The former Army base could ease the city’s low-income housing shortage or school overcrowding. It just probably can’t do both.

Sam’s Club Locations in Auburn, Renton, Seattle Abruptly Close

The move comes after the company announced plans to increase worker pay and benefits.

Judge Rules Seattle Is in Compliance with Consent Decree

The news ushers in a two-year monitoring period in which the city can’t slip up.

For Opponents of a Carbon Tax, an Initiative Threat Looms

If legislators don’t act on the governor’s legislation, a plan could land on the November ballot.

Most Read