Billionaire Developer Selig Dumps Trump

Selig told the Seattle Times yesterday he’s backing out as a co-host of a Trump fundraiser in Seattle.

Martin Selig, the Seattle billionaire real estate developer who last week emerged as a major fundraiser for Donald Trump, has disavowed his support for the Republican nominee.

Selig told the Seattle Times yesterday that he had been “blinded” as a loyal Republican into supporting Trump. He added that he was surprised by the blowback he got when he emerged as a Trump supporter.

“Do you know what it’s like being a Jewish Republican in Seattle?” Selig told the Times.

Selig’s family fled Nazi Germany in 1939 and landed in Seattle, where they started a series of successful businesses. Speaking to Seattle Weekly last week, Selig argued that Trump would support a smaller government, which would help the economy. He also criticized Hillary Clinton for what he saw as “unforgivable” dishonesty about the Benghazi terrorist attack.

Yet it was clear that he and Trump didn’t exactly see eye-to-eye. For example, Selig emphasized the importance of trade to Seattle’s economy; Trump is notably protectionist. Selig’s own biography—which found the United States providing his family refuge from terror abroad—seemed to grate against Trump’s anti-immigration rhetoric. At one point in our interview, he noted that “this country kept us alive, allowed us in.”

“But it gives you no pause to hear Trump talk of keeping people out?” we replied.

“It doesn’t bother me,” he said. “I’m quite sure there’s a lot more depth to it. That what he means is keeping people out who’d do harm to us.”

Apparently he’s thought a little more about it. He tells the Times he will be writing in a candidate for president.

More in News & Comment

Protestors gather at SeaTac’s Families Belong Together rally. Photo by Alex Garland
Seattle’s Separated Children

A local non-profit houses several immigrant youths who were separated from their parents at the border. But for how long?

While King County Metro has been testing out several trial electric buses since since 2016, the agency aims to have a fully electric bus fleet by 2040. Photo by SounderBruce/Flickr
King County Rolls on With Its Electric Bus Fleet Plans

With an overhaul set by 2040, a new report shows the economic and health benefits of going electric.

Nikkita Oliver speaks at a July 17 No New Youth Jail press conference in front of the construction site of the King County Youth Detention Center. Photo by Josh Kelety
King County Youth Detention Center Moves Forward Despite Opposition

As community criticism of the project mounts, King County tries to take a middle road.

Trouble in Tacoma

A cannabis producer has been shut down for “numerous and substantial violations.”

Between Seattle’s $15 minimum wage and the new no-poach cause agreement, Washington has been leading the nation in advancing fast food workers’ rights. Photo by Fibonacci Blue/Flickr
Washington AG’s Deal Grants Mobility to Fast Food Workers Nationwide

Seven fast food chains have agreed to end no-poaching policies that economists say cause wage stagnation.

The Carlton Complex wildfire burned in north-central Washington state in 2014. Photo by Jason Kriess/Wikimedia Commons
King County Burn Ban Starts This Weekend

Other counties across the state have already enacted similar restrictions.

Numerous complaints against King County Sheriff’s deputies for issues like excessive force and improper search and seizure weren’t investigated due to internal misclassification, a new report says. Photo by Oran Viriyincy/Flickr
Report Finds Complaints Against King County Sheriff’s Deputies Weren’t Investigated

An outside review says that allegations of excessive force and racially-biased policing weren’t pursued.

Last spring, Sarah Smith (second from left) travelled to Tennessee to meet with other Brand New Congress candidates including Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (right). Photo courtesy Brand New Congress
Can Sarah Smith Be Seattle’s Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez?

The 30-year-old democratic socialist is challenging a long-serving incumbent in Washington’s 9th Congressional District.

Most Read