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Lanterns Shine Light in the Darkness During “From Hiroshima to Hope”

Thousands of Seattleites gathered at Green Lake to commemorate 72 years since the nuclear bomb.

Seventy-two years ago on August 6, the United States became the first and only country in history to use nuclear weapons. Dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, the two bombs killed an estimated 129,000-226,000 people. To commemorate this dark turning point in human history, Seattleites gathered around Green Lake this weekend for the From Hiroshima to Hope ceremony, a local tradition that began in 1984. To honor those who died in the bombings and in a call for peace, attendees wrote messages on thousands of laterns and set them adrift.










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