CoffeePot.jpg
As Seattle is the city of coffee, you've probably heard of (or experienced) the dangers of over-caffeination. Too much caffeine can leave you a sweaty

"/>

Coffee and Green Tea Linked to Lower Stroke Risks

CoffeePot.jpg
As Seattle is the city of coffee, you've probably heard of (or experienced) the dangers of over-caffeination. Too much caffeine can leave you a sweaty mess, with the jitters, insomnia, nausea and even worse heart palpitations.

But if you can handle all that caffeine, there may be a silver lining. A new study published in The Journal of the American Heart Association reveals that green tea and coffee are associated with lowered stroke risks.

The study surveyed 80,000 Japanese men and women aged 45 too 74 years old who self-reported green tea or coffee consumption. At the beginning of the study, none of the participants had cardiovascular disease or cancer. A follow-up with participants about 13 years later revealed incidence of 4,335 cardiovascular disease events, such as incidence of strokes or coronary heart disease.

What set apart those with cardiovascular diseases and those without? After controlling variables such as age, weight, and certain lifestyle choices, researchers found that the answer could be linked to what and how much you drink.

High green tea consumption, measured by more than or equal to two times a day, or high coffee consumption, measured by more than or equal to one time a day saw reduced risks of cardiovascular disease and all strokes in comparison to those who did not drink green tea or coffee, according to the study.

The study revealed in comparison to non-coffee and non-tea drinkers, people who drank two to three cups of green tea had 14 percent decreased risk of stroke. And green tea junkies, who drank more than four cups of green tea per day had 20 percent reduced risk of stroke.

Although one cup of coffee a day can decrease stroke risk by 20 percent in comparison to non-coffee drinkers, the study found that high consumption of coffee did not share miraculous health results like its counterpart green tea.

High coffee consumption was linked to coronary artery disease, but researchers found that it was linked to a variable-- smoking. Coffee diehards tended to be younger, with a higher prevalence of smoking, according to the study.

Either way, it's good news for the many caffeine-dependent Seattleites. Keep on drinking that coffee or green tea, it might help save your life.

Follow The Daily Weekly on Facebook & Twitter.

 
comments powered by Disqus