Local Bands and Artists Team Up for Forty-Two Inches of Record Store Day Fun

Fainting Room Collective’s Triple-Six 7-Inch Box Set features records from Haunted Horses, Bali Girls, Stickers, He Whose Ox Is Gored, The Family Curse, and Transmissionary.

Sales of vinyl records rose 32 percent in 2015. This is great news for the music industry at large. But the uptick brings a bitter pill for the scores of smaller labels forever at the mercy of vinyl pressing plants more eager to run another 20,000 Adele LPs than a small run of seven-inches for an arts collective from Seattle.

For Megan Tweed, part of the Fainting Room Collective, whose Triple-Six 7-Inch Box Set will finally hit local stores this month, this meant that one-third of the bands involved in the project broke up in the time it took to get the records into stores.

Started in San Francisco in 2005 as a means for releasing records, the Fainting Room Collective migrated to Seattle in 2012, where it assembled a group of producers, corporate speech writers, recording engineers, art-gallery owners, photographers, and more. The collective’s inaugural Northwest endeavor was Practice Space Seattle, an online directory of band rehearsal spaces organized by neighborhood. Its latest collaboration is a collection of six 7-inch records from six Seattle bands, each with artwork created by a local visual artist. Laurie Kearney, who owns Capitol Hill’s Ghost Gallery and is also part of the collective, matched each band with an artist.

“We tend to go back to the same collaborators over and over and over again, especially in the music and art space,” Tweed says, “so we wanted to gather a handful of bands and a handful of visual artists and collaborate in hopes that they would find new connections in each other’s communities.”

The He Whose Ox Is Gored record includes stark black and white artwork from Demian Johnston. Transmissionary’s release features a colorful image of digital feedback from Cait Willis. And the Bali Girls’ cover includes a gorgeous abstract work in a muted palette from Sam Whalen. Stickers and Haunted Horses also appear, but both have since disbanded.

The release will be available at local record shops on Record Store Day, April 16, wrapped in a black tote bag for around $35–$40. It will be followed by an April 20 show at Chop Suey that features all the bands from the box set except for Stickers, but including Haunted Horses, who will reunite for one final show. E

music@seattleweekly.com

Cait Willis’ cover art for Transmissionary.

More in Music

Musicians Rally for a Free #SaveTheShowbox Concert at City Hall

The event corresponds with the City’s public land use hearing regarding expanding the Pike Place Market Historic District.

Angel Olsen: Always worth a closer inspection. Photo by Taylor Boylston
The Bare Bones of Angel Olsen

Seattle Weekly chats with the reflective singer-songwriter ahead of her Seattle solo show.

Album Premiere: Lizzie Weber – ‘You’

The Seattle folk singer-songwriter pens potent and poetic breakup songs on her new EP.

Labor Day weekend, Bumbershoot style.
A Look Back at Bumbershoot 2018

Thoughts and photos to recap the annual extravaganza.

Knife Knights emerges from the woods to play its first public live set at Bumbershoot. Photo by Justin Henning
Bumbershoot 2018 Picks

Music headliners, comedians, and local favorites: These are the acts to seek out at this weekend’s festivities.

Best of Seattle 2018: Arts & Entertainment

Best Musical Act Thunderpussy After years, 2018 finally (finally!) saw Thunderpussy put… Continue reading

Jessica McKenna and Zach Reino get a touch melodramatic about not needing a script for Off Book: The Improvised Musical podcast. Photo by Robyn Von Swank
‘Off Book’: Silly Story Singing Sans Script

The Broadway-worthy hijinks of ‘Off Book: The Improvised Musical’ podcast come to Bumbershoot.

Whitney Ballen Is a ‘Shooting Star’

The destinctive-voiced Isaquah singer-songwriter comes into her own on her new album ‘You’re a Shooting Star, I’m a Sinking Ship.’

Death Cab for Cutie Doesn’t Connect on ‘Thank You For Today’

While it’d be a fine record for most bands, the group’s new album falls short of its own standard thanks to questionable production and sequencing decisions.

Eddie Vedder at an earlier 2018 Pearl Jam show. Photo by Raph_PH/Flickr
Pearl Jam As Rock Archivists

The Home Shows at Safeco Field weren’t about the band’s legacy, but that of the genre as a whole.

Photo by Josh Kelety
City Council Passes Temporary Historic Protection for The Showbox

With a lively crowd on hand, the Council unanimously voted to delay any demolition of the venue by 10 months.

The 10 Best Moments From SPF30

A look back at the high points of Sub Pop’s 30th anniversary blowout.