Reviews: Every Local Release

Corvx de Timor, “Always Rain” (out now, Automation Records, soundcloud.com/ corvxdetimor): This Sacramento “dark electronic” producer supplies the most recent addition to Automation Records’ monthly singles series with this brooding down-tempo track, featuring a descending minor-key piano loop, a minimal drum-machine beat, and a recurring sample that, appropriately, sounds a lot like rain.

Dead Ship Sailing, Dead Ship Sailing (out now, self-released, deadshipsailing.com): The duo continues their tradition of straightforward rock ’n’ roll with their first full-length release of electro-infused garage-rock tracks. Think Crystal Castles without all the gothic undertones; this collection is not refined, it’s messy and urgent.

* Kinski, Cosy Moments (4/2, Kill Rock Stars, killrockstars.com/artists/kinski): On their first new album in six years, Kinski has found a fantastic mesh point between pop-savvy melody and their classic psychedelic progressions. (Fri., April 5, Sunset) TODD HAMM

Letters From Traffic, Icarus Advance EP (out now, self-released, www.lettersfromtraffic.com): Gritty Americana vocals laid over big-band bombast, this EP is a sneak peek at the band’s impending full-length debut, Icarus Iterations. Electric riffs, tinny percussion, and jazz horns give simple songs a funky, groovy twist. (Sat., April 27, Madison Pub, Everett)

Antoine Martel, “Coughdrops in Autumn” (out now, self-released, antoinemartel.bandcamp.com): It’s hard to tell that singer/songwriter Martel had sinus issues before recording this album; throughout his voice maintains a strong, smooth tone that matches perfectly the breezy, acoustic backing band.

* Art Vandelay, Eye 8 the Crow (4/2, self-released, artvandelay206.bandcamp.com): A big step forward for the MC/producer duo Ricky Pharoe and Mack Formway, E8TC perfectly captures Pharoe’s rap persona(entirely loathing pop culture), and Formway’s production has only gotten bigger and better. TODD HAMM

* Vox Mod, SYN-ÆSTHETIC (out now, self-released, voxmod.com): There’s a good chance this ends up being producer Scot Porter’s breakout. It’s got local star power (contributions from Ishmael Butler and Erik Blood), infinite-sounding instrumental synth workouts (“Quetzalcoatlus,” “Filament (Incantation)”), and most important, a unified aesthetic that makes the many guest appearances mesh with his singular production style.

 
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