Not everyone feels celebratory at the holidays. Remember, it’s okay to take some time and space for yourself, or to ask for help.

Not everyone feels celebratory at the holidays. Remember, it’s okay to take some time and space for yourself, or to ask for help.

Are the Holidays too Much? Tips to Manage Stress this Holiday Season

Leaves are changing colors, pumpkin spice is in the air and little lights are going up, marking the beginning of the holiday season.

While this time of year is largely celebrated for joy, togetherness and thankfulness, not everyone is able to greet the season with the same sense of happiness. For many reasons, the holiday season can be difficult.

The holidays can invoke many difficult feelings due to pressures to feel a particular way, reminders of past holidays or lost loved ones, or even financial hardships. That’s why it’s important to remember self-care throughout this time. Below is a list to give you some ideas for how you can help manage stress this holiday season:

  1. Acknowledge how you’re feeling. It’s okay to feel however you do, and you don’t have to feel a certain way just because it’s the holiday season. If you’re not feeling celebratory, it’s okay to take some time and space for yourself to take care.
  2. Plan ahead. Planning for events, menus or shopping lists can help you avoid the stress of a last-minute trip and can grant you peace of mind to avoid forgetting items.
  3. Stick to a budget. Before you go shopping for the holidays, make sure to plan for what you can afford and stick to it. Doing this can help take the burden off financial stress and help you find what’s realistic for you. For those with low-income or without shelter, you can also call 2-1-1 to find holiday resources that may be of help.
  4. Take some time for yourself. It’s not selfish to take time for yourself and can be necessary to reduce stress and clear your mind. It’s much harder to complete tasks or take care of others, if your needs aren’t being met. Set realistic boundaries for what you can and cannot do, and be okay with saying “no” to things that don’t make you feel happy or comfortable.
  5. Ask for help. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, remember it’s okay to ask for help.
  6. Reach out. If you are experiencing feelings of loneliness, isolation, depression, stress, or grief, reach out to someone you love and trust. If you would prefer to reach out anonymously, you can always call Crisis Connections’ phone lines:
  • 24/7/365 – 24-Hour Crisis Line: 1.866.789.1511
  • 24/7/365 – WA Recovery Help Line: 1.866.789.1511
  • 6 to 10 Every Evening – Teen Link: 1.866.TEENLINK
  • 5 to 9 Every Evening– WA Warm Line: 1.877.500.WARM
  • 8 to 4pm, M to F (closed for federal holidays) King County 2-1-1: 2-1-1

Remember, there are many reasons for why the holidays can be stressful and difficult for people. Your experience and your feelings are valid.

For more information, visit www.crisisconnections.org

More in Marketplace

The new 2020 Vision Campaign, which received $30,000 in seed funding from Comcast Washington, will improve education and, ultimately, careers in the technology field.
2020 Vision Campaign drives technology access for minority groups

Innovative Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle program boosts resources for STEM training

Not everyone feels celebratory at the holidays. Remember, it’s okay to take some time and space for yourself, or to ask for help.
Are the Holidays too Much? Tips to Manage Stress this Holiday Season

Leaves are changing colors, pumpkin spice is in the air and little… Continue reading

The QUALITY answer to online dating

Welcome to The Inner Circle

The Benefits of CBD for Older Adults

Having trouble falling asleep, or staying rested throughout the night? Or are… Continue reading

The Deadly Truth About Isolation and how You can Stay Connected

New technology campaign helps keep people connected

September is Suicide Prevention Month, and Crisis Connections is joining with community partners to help others learn about resources that can help during times of crisis.
In spite of rising rates of suicide, what can you do to help?

According to the Center for Disease Control’s monthly report Vital Signs, suicide… Continue reading

Domestic violence IS preventable: July 21’s Refuse To Abuse 5k is a unique run/walk through every level of Safeco Field, from the players’ tunnel to the final lap around the field.
LifeWire provides a lifeline for woman fleeing abuse

Refuse to Abuse 5K at Safeco Field raises funds and awareness to fight domestic violence

Join the July 21 Refuse To Abuse 5k, a joint event from the Seattle Mariners and the Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence.
Survivor shares message of strength: Domestic violence is preventable

Lace up for the Refuse to Abuse 5k, July 21 at Safeco Stadium

The Refuse to Abuse 5k, at Safeco Field July 21, supports the Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence. Ben VanHouten photo
Step out – and onto Safeco Field! – to help put an end to domestic violence

Start the discussion and register today for the Refuse to Abuse 5K

Some 250,000 people are expected throughout the weekend for this year’s Northwest Folklife Festival. Christopher Nelson photo
Cultural celebrations for the people, by the people

The community-curated, community-powered and community-driven Northwest Folklife

Top Komen Race for the Cure fundraisers Heidi May, left, and Laura Mendoza. Mendoza was the No. 1 overall fundraiser for 2017 and May was the No. 1 survivor fundraiser. Photo by Scott Eklund/Red Box Pictures
‘Pink Sisterhood’ unites to Race for the Cure

Walk, run, volunteer or donate to create life-saving change in the fight against breast cancer