Live Tonight: Fuck Buttons, Kraftwerk, S. Carey

Andrew Hung and Benjamin Power of Fuck Buttons don’t want you to be comfortable. This London-based duo creates hypnotic electronic soundscapes that explore the grislier side of things. From production to making their own knobs and instruments, the pair has a hand in every aspect of their albums, and each detail is intentional. Their most recent album, Slow Focus, throbs with dense compositions that balance beauty and brutality. In every song, harsh synthesizers build upon driving beats, crescendoing into a symphony of distorted bliss, moving with great dynamism. Arrangements evoke images of an expansive tundra, cold yet full of space and solace. As the album settles in, you start to relax in the discomfort; to hear the brilliant subtleties within every moment of feedback; to relish this different kind of harmony. Hung and Power don’t want you to be comfortable, and this is good. Like most things, there is no progress without moments of dissonance; excitement and exhilaration are often on the other side of the coin. With Total Life. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-4618, thecrocodile.com. 8 p.m. $18. All ages. STIRLING MYLES

Everything about Kraftwerk is exacting. Founded in 1970, the troupe included four players, then halved; Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider continued to execute lean electronic music through 2008, when Schneider retired (presumably he needed an oil change) and the group halved again. Hütter enlisted a new trio of performers to flesh out the group again to four and fill out his electronic dream, complete with a new vision to render Kraftwerk’s eight albums (several early efforts have been disavowed) alongside 3-D projections. With a new album reportedly in the works—that’s nine total—expect that Hütter’s not quite done yet; he’ll likely produce a 10th, just to round it off. The Paramount, 911 Pine St., 902-5500, stgpresents.org/paramount. 7:30 p.m. $33.75–$65.75. DAVE CANTOR

Bon Iver’s S. Carey is carving out a solid solo career for himself. His just-released sophomore album, Range of Light, is a follow-up to 2010’s All We Grow, and continues to demonstrate his skill with subtlety and layers. “Fire-scene” is a perfect example of what the S. Carey experience is like, with folk and jazz rhythms augmented by classical piano strains as he repeatedly, hypnotically, sings lines like “On and on/All I want is honesty.” Adding oomph to the song is its accompanying video, which plays like a vivid, chillingly beautiful call for tourists to come to the northeast in the dead of winter. Gorgeous stuff. With the Pines. The Triple Door. 7:30 p.m. $16. All ages. BRIAN PALMER

 
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