Some of the women from Women He’s Undressed. Courtesy Damien Parer Productions

Selections for the Second Week of the Seattle International Film Festival

Our critic selects the best of the fest.

Women He’s Undressed A documentary look at the improbable life of Orry-Kelly, a gay man from a tiny town in Australia who became one of Hollywood’s celebrated costume designers. Gillian Armstrong’s flamboyant film leans too heavily on Kelly’s ambiguous friendship with Cary Grant, but brings a glitzy chapter of movie history to light. May 27, 1:30 p.m., Pacific Place; June 6, 7 p.m., Egyptian

Ma Ma A strong performance by Penélope Cruz keeps this Spanish cancer drama rooted in a believable human reality, even as director Julio Medem flirts with magical realism—or a lot of odd coincidences, anyway—around the edges. Don’t be surprised if Cruz gets an Oscar push. May 25, 6:30 p.m., Majestic Bay; May 27, 4 p.m., Egyptian

Paths of the Soul Villagers from a Tibetan town take a 1,200-kilometer pilgrimage to the holy city of Lhasa. The film is not a documentary, but a stunningly photographed road movie like no other—and a spellbinding experience overall. Director Zhang Yang is scheduled to attend. May 26, 6:30 p.m., Lincoln Square; May 27, 4 p.m., Uptown

The Lure Your typical Polish musical comedy about mermaids who come to life in a Warsaw burlesque club. The film is so zany it doesn’t really hold together, but something somber at its core makes the whole thing work. Director Agnieszka Smoczynska is scheduled to attend. May 27, 9:30 p.m., Egyptian; May 28, 4 p.m., Egyptian; May 29, 9:15 p.m., Shoreline Community College

Tag Required viewing for fans of off-the-charts Japanese cult cinema: A schoolgirl witnesses the sudden, gory destruction of her classmates (by a killer wind, apparently), then stumbles into a possible alternate reality in which the kids are alive again but very, very much in danger. Later she turns into a different girl who is about to be married to a hybrid man-pig. From the director of Why Don’t You Play in Hell? May 27, 11:59 p.m., Egyptian; June 2, 9:30 p.m., Egyptian; June 7, 9:30 p.m., Uptown

Tiny: The Life of Erin Blackwell The classic 1983 filmed-in-Seattle documentary Streetwise is revisited in this unbelievably sobering look at one of the adolescents from that film. Don’t expect life wisdom or redemption; the subject is now in her mid-40s, with 10 children in various stages of struggle; the whole thing is like a cruel parable about the loss of innocence. Director Martin Bell is scheduled to attend. May 29, 4 p.m., Pacific Place; May 30, 11 a.m., Pacific Place

film@seattleweekly.com

More in Film

Things Get Messy in ‘On the Beach at Night Alone’

The latest from Hong Sang-soo is engaging, but maybe a little too real.

Courtesy of Blue Sky Studios
Ferdinand Is Too Big for Its Bullring

The modern take on the classic children’s story fails when stretched to feature length.

‘Wonder Wheel’ Needs Room to Breathe

Woody Allen’s latest is filled with dialogue, but what is it really saying?

Photo by Nicola Dove/Twentieth Century Fox
                                Josh Gad, left, and Johnny Depp star in Murder on the Orient Express.
Kenneth Branagh Brings Some Fun to ‘Murder on the Orient Express’

A starry cast, old-fashioned screenwriting, and a gigantic mustache make for a satisfying whodunit.

‘The Square’ Is Anything But

Funny, satirical, outrageous—director Ruben Östlund creates an arthouse roller-coaster ride.

‘Thor: Ragnarok’ Weds Humor and the Hammer

The latest from Marvel injects its hero with much-needed levity.

Sparks Fly Amongst the Manure in ‘God’s Own Country’

Director Francis Lee takes viewer down to the farm for romance.

The Truth and Beauty of ‘Human Flow’

Artist Ai Weiwei takes viewers to the borderlands for a bird’s-eye view of displacement

Most Read