Some of the women from Women He’s Undressed. Courtesy Damien Parer Productions

Selections for the Second Week of the Seattle International Film Festival

Our critic selects the best of the fest.

Women He’s Undressed A documentary look at the improbable life of Orry-Kelly, a gay man from a tiny town in Australia who became one of Hollywood’s celebrated costume designers. Gillian Armstrong’s flamboyant film leans too heavily on Kelly’s ambiguous friendship with Cary Grant, but brings a glitzy chapter of movie history to light. May 27, 1:30 p.m., Pacific Place; June 6, 7 p.m., Egyptian

Ma Ma A strong performance by Penélope Cruz keeps this Spanish cancer drama rooted in a believable human reality, even as director Julio Medem flirts with magical realism—or a lot of odd coincidences, anyway—around the edges. Don’t be surprised if Cruz gets an Oscar push. May 25, 6:30 p.m., Majestic Bay; May 27, 4 p.m., Egyptian

Paths of the Soul Villagers from a Tibetan town take a 1,200-kilometer pilgrimage to the holy city of Lhasa. The film is not a documentary, but a stunningly photographed road movie like no other—and a spellbinding experience overall. Director Zhang Yang is scheduled to attend. May 26, 6:30 p.m., Lincoln Square; May 27, 4 p.m., Uptown

The Lure Your typical Polish musical comedy about mermaids who come to life in a Warsaw burlesque club. The film is so zany it doesn’t really hold together, but something somber at its core makes the whole thing work. Director Agnieszka Smoczynska is scheduled to attend. May 27, 9:30 p.m., Egyptian; May 28, 4 p.m., Egyptian; May 29, 9:15 p.m., Shoreline Community College

Tag Required viewing for fans of off-the-charts Japanese cult cinema: A schoolgirl witnesses the sudden, gory destruction of her classmates (by a killer wind, apparently), then stumbles into a possible alternate reality in which the kids are alive again but very, very much in danger. Later she turns into a different girl who is about to be married to a hybrid man-pig. From the director of Why Don’t You Play in Hell? May 27, 11:59 p.m., Egyptian; June 2, 9:30 p.m., Egyptian; June 7, 9:30 p.m., Uptown

Tiny: The Life of Erin Blackwell The classic 1983 filmed-in-Seattle documentary Streetwise is revisited in this unbelievably sobering look at one of the adolescents from that film. Don’t expect life wisdom or redemption; the subject is now in her mid-40s, with 10 children in various stages of struggle; the whole thing is like a cruel parable about the loss of innocence. Director Martin Bell is scheduled to attend. May 29, 4 p.m., Pacific Place; May 30, 11 a.m., Pacific Place

film@seattleweekly.com

More in Film

Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) returns to once again square off with Michael Myers in the new ‘Halloween.’ Photo by Ryan Green/Universal Studios
Still Killin’ It

Michael Myers has been coming home for decades now, ever since he… Continue reading

Trailer Park Blues

Megan Griffiths’s Sadie taps into the dark side of teenage angst through Sophia Mitri Schloss’s strong lead performance.

Kena (Samantha Mugatsia) and Ziki (Sheila Munyiva) are beacons of light in <em>Rafiki</em>. Image courtesy Film Movement
Getting It Twisted

What to watch for at this year’s edition of Twist: A Queer Film Festival.

Ryan Gosling blasts off as Neil Armstrong in First Man. Photo by Daniel McFadden
Sea of Tranquility

In Damien Chazelle’s ‘First Man,’ Ryan Gosling delivers a fascinating blank slate portrayal of astronaut Neil Armstrong.

Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga as star-crossed lovers. Photo by Neal Preston
Not the Brightest Star in the Sky

Lady Gaga shines in the otherwise underwhelming ‘A Star Is Born.’

First-time actor Ben Dickey (with guitar) stars as the titular country songwriter Blaze Foley. Courtesy IFC Films
Down in a ‘Blaze’ of Glory

Writer/director Ethan Hawke aptly portrays Blaze Foley’s never-made-it musical legend.

Cate Blanchett, Owen Vaccaro, and Jack Black get their kiddie horror on in The House 
With a Clock in Its Walls. Photo courtesy Storyteller Distribution Co.
Tick, Tick… Boo!

Jack Black and Cate Blanchett can’t prevent the spooky kids’ movie The House with a Clock in Its Walls from feeling a bit insincere.

If you see the poster art for Mandy and are surprised it’s wild, it’s your own damn fault.
Totally Uncaging the Cage

Nicolas Cage taps into his manical best for the acid-trip fantasy revenge film, ‘Mandy.’

Robert Redford says goodbye with The Old Man & the Gun. Photo by Eric Zachanowich/Twentieth Century Fox
Fall Movie Preview 2018

From Oscar hopefuls to broad comedies, here’s what the season’s film slate has to offer.

John Cho logs on to find his missing daughter in Searching. Photo by Sebastian Baron
Social (Media) Thriller

While not escapist fare, Searching ‘s story of a father searching for his daughter online does feel authentically of the internet.

Regina Hall (center) leads the Double Whammies crew in Support the Girls. Photo courtesy Magnolia Pictures
Character Meets Cleavage in ‘Support the Girls’

Don’t be fooled by Hooters-esque facade. The Regina Hall-led film is a warm, funny, and communal.

Kelly Macdonald, Irrfan Khan, and director Marc Turtletaub put together the pieces on the set of Puzzle. 
Photo by Linda Kallerus/Sony Pictures Classics
Can ‘Puzzle’ Fit in the New Oscars Landscape?

The understated indie boasts a fabulous performance by Kelly Macdonald, but does that matter in the Best Popular Film era?