stress.jpg
Creative Commons/abominationflysouth
Here's a shocker: young people are fucking stressed out. They're stressed about money. They're stressed about their job (or lack thereof). And their

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Survey: Millenials Are Hella Stressed-Out

stress.jpg
Creative Commons/abominationflysouth
Here's a shocker: young people are fucking stressed out. They're stressed about money. They're stressed about their job (or lack thereof). And their stressed about a healthcare system that's failing them.

In fact, according to a survey released last week by the American Psychological Association, Millenials are the most stressed-out age group of Americans who participated.

According to the survey, which was conducted online among 2,020 U.S. adults in August of 2012 by a company called Harris Interactive, on a ten-point scale the national average stress level is a 4.9. However, Millenials - age 18-33 - report a significantly higher 5.4. The survey also found that more Millenials than any other age group reported that their stress level had increased over the last year, and 52 percent of participating Millenials responding that stress had kept them up at night.

As NBC noted, Generation Xers' stress level was actually tied with Millenials - both reporting a 5.4 on the ten-point scale - but fewer Gen-Xers reported that their stress level had increased over the last year.

Here's the breakdown of what the survey found about the stressful plight of Millenials:

Millennials (age 18-33) in particular seem to have trouble managing their stress and getting health care that meets their needs. The Stress in America survey found Millennials reporting an average stress level of 5.4 on a 10-point scale, exceeding the national average (4.9). This generation also gives its health care lower marks than Americans across the country: Millennials are less likely than people nationwide to give their health care an "A" grade (25 percent versus 31 percent). Nearly half of Millennials (49 percent) do not believe or are not sure that they are doing enough to manage their stress, and few say they get stress or behavior management support from their health care provider. Only 23 percent think that their health care provider supports them a "lot or a great deal" in their desire to make healthy lifestyle and behavior changes, and just 17 percent say the same about their health care providers' support for stress management.

While the stress-level findings of the survey are certainly interesting - and were the focus of most media accounts - the takeaway has more to do with the failings of the health care system when it comes to stress management, care and prevention. Officially titled, "Stress in Americaâ„¢: Missing the Health Care Connection," the study suggests, "that people are not receiving what they need from their health care providers to manage stress and address lifestyle and behavior changes to improve their health."

You can check out the full survey here.

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