arod smoking a cigar.jpg
If there's one thing Seattle sports fans take pleasure in it's the consistent failures of Alex Rodriguez. And this morning, courtesy of an expansive story

"/>

Former Mariner And All-Around Douche Alex Rodriguez Linked to PEDs By Miami New Times Story

arod smoking a cigar.jpg
If there's one thing Seattle sports fans take pleasure in it's the consistent failures of Alex Rodriguez. And this morning, courtesy of an expansive story in the Miami New Times, we've been given more ammunition for our hatred.

According to a three-month investigation conducted by the New Times' Tim Elfrink, Rodriguez and a slew of other big name sports stars have been linked to the recently closed Miami-based anti-aging clinic Biogenesis, which allegedly supplied the big-name athletes with performance enhancing drugs like human growth hormone (HGH), testosterone and anabolic steroids.

For those who enjoy pointing and laughing at A-Rod, this is far better than the time the overpaid Yankees star went shopping for white denim at J Crew.

This, as they say in the business, is a bombshell.

From the Miami New Times:

Open the neat spreadsheet and scroll past the listing of local developers, prominent attorneys, and personal trainers. You'll find a lengthy list of nicknames: Mostro, Al Capone, El Cacique, Samurai, Yukon, Mohamad, Felix Cat, and D.R.

Then check out the main column, where their real names flash like an all-star roster of professional athletes with Miami ties: San Francisco Giants outfielder Melky Cabrera, Oakland A's hurler Bartolo Colón, pro tennis player Wayne Odesnik, budding Cuban superstar boxer Yuriorkis Gamboa, and Texas Rangers slugger Nelson Cruz. There's even the New York Yankees' $275 million man himself, Alex Rodriguez, who has sworn he stopped juicing a decade ago.

Read further and you'll find more than a dozen other baseball pros, from former University of Miami ace Cesar Carrillo to Padres catcher Yasmani Grandal to Washington Nationals star Gio Gonzalez. Notable coaches are there too, including UM baseball conditioning guru Jimmy Goins.

The names are all included in an extraordinary batch of records from Biogenesis, an anti-aging clinic tucked into a two-story office building just a hard line drive's distance from the UM campus. They were given to New Times by an employee who worked at Biogenesis before it closed last month and its owner abruptly disappeared. The records are clear in describing the firm's real business: selling performance-enhancing drugs, from human growth hormone (HGH) to testosterone to anabolic steroids.

Interviews with six customers and two former employees corroborate the tale told by the patient files, the payment records, and the handwritten notebooks kept by the clinic's chief, 49-year-old Anthony Bosch.

It only gets juicer from there. Do yourself a favor and read the full story here.

UPDATE: Predictably, A-Rod is denying the Miami New Times report. Meanwhile, Major League Baseball is investigating.

Follow The Daily Weekly on Facebook & Twitter.

 
comments powered by Disqus

Friends to Follow