Randy Dorn1.jpg
Randy Dorn
According to a press release distributed this morning by State Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn, "Recent anecdotal reports from school districts suggest

"/>

Washington State Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn Issues Statement on Legalized Weed

Randy Dorn1.jpg
Randy Dorn
According to a press release distributed this morning by State Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn, "Recent anecdotal reports from school districts suggest an increase in marijuana possession and consumption among young people, especially after the passage of Initiative 502 ..."

*See Also: Smoking Weed Now Officially Legal in Colorado Too

Apparently, in the five days possession of weed has been legal for adults in Washington, what Dorn has seen has worried him. It's worried him so much, in fact, that - like many places, from state universities to the DOT to major employers - Dorn has issued a statement clarifying what I-502 means to our state's public schools.

Here's a hint: nothing changes. You still can't possess or smoke weed in Washington schools.

But don't take my word for it. Here's Dorn's statement:

The passage of I-502 changes nothing in public schools in Washington state. Certain drugs, including marijuana, continue to be illegal on school property and to anyone younger than 21 years old.

To receive federal funds, districts must abide by the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act and must have a Drug and Tobacco-Free Workplace and a similar student policy in place. Each district's policy has a number of common requirements about marijuana and other drugs, such as not allowing any student to:

· Possess,

· Distribute,

· Manufacture or

· Be under the influence.

Any student caught will be disciplined according to local district policy and local law enforcement as required. Fines can also be doubled if the arrest occurs within 1,000 feet of a school facility.

I-502 changes state law but has no effect on federal law.

Some people think that a medical marijuana card is similar to a prescription for a controlled substance and can be brought to schools or the workplace. That is false. Having a medical marijuana card does not mean a student, or an employee, or anyone for that matter, can bring marijuana on school grounds.

Students need to be engaged and prepared for school. Marijuana doesn't allow them to be either of those things. Marijuana dulls the brain. It can lead to paranoia, short-term memory loss and depression.

And for those under 21, it is illegal.

Follow the Daily Weekly on Facebook & Twitter.

 
comments powered by Disqus