Thumbnail image for liquor.jpg
According to the state Department of Revenue, Washingtonians are buying more booze - and paying more for it - since the state got out of

"/>

Booze Sales Up in Washington, and So Is the Price

Thumbnail image for liquor.jpg
According to the state Department of Revenue, Washingtonians are buying more booze - and paying more for it - since the state got out of the liquor-selling business.

*See Also: Cheap Liquor at Privatization's Dawn

As Christina Salerno notes today on the Capitol Record blog, liquor sales are up nearly three percent from June through September this year, compared to the same period of time last year. Salerno also notes that "a standard liter of liquor now costs an average of $2 more per bottle than last year."

In terms of the raw numbers, the Capitol Record reports that roughly 13.6 million liters of liquor were sold from June through September, while 13.2 million liters were sold during the same period of time in 2011.

However, while overall booze sales are up, not everyone is buying more - specifically bars.

From the Capitol Record:

Bars and restaurants, meanwhile, are buying less -- there was a 13 percent drop in liquor purchases from businesses from June to September. The revenue department speculates that's because businesses stockpiled in May, before the privatization law went into effect.

To put the booze price increase in perspective, the Capitol Record reports that, "A year ago, the average retail price for a liter of liquor, including taxes, was $21.58. The same bottle now costs an average of $24.09 -- a nearly 12 percent increase."

While it's interesting to pore over the numbers, it's not shocking to hear booze sales are up since hard liquor hit places like Target and Safeway. The pure number of tantalizing Jim Beam endcaps in grocery stores these days can likely be connected to the spike in people buying liquor. I know such displays have gotten me at least once or twice since privatization hit (conservative estimate).

Follow the Daily Weekly on Facebook & Twitter.

 
comments powered by Disqus