Lance Easley Blown Call.jpg
Image Source
Lance Easley is on the right.
While Lance Easley isn't the villain in Seattle that he is in Wisconsin - and much of

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Replacement Ref Who Botched Seahawks-Packers Touchdown Call Still Haunted

Lance Easley Blown Call.jpg
Image Source
Lance Easley is on the right.
While Lance Easley isn't the villain in Seattle that he is in Wisconsin - and much of the country - the replacement ref famous for first raising his hands in the air and blowing the now infamous Golden Tate "Fail Marry" touchdown call still lives his life haunted by the mistake.

*See Also: Beast Mode: Top 10 Seahawks Memes

In a telling (and pretty damn sad) piece recently published in the Washington Post, Easley - a 52-year-old bank vice president - gives what the paper calls his "first extensive interview since the Seattle game."

While many - including myself - have made plenty of fun of Easley and his botched touchdown call, the piece drives home the fact that, if anything, Easley was collateral damage in the NFL's greed war with its real refs, and his life will probably never be the same because of it.

Easley, who once officiated football and basketball games in his spare time, no longer does either - activities he once greatly enjoyed. He's gained weight. He's received countless death threats. He's the butt of constant jokes. And deep down, though his faith helps him believe that his suffering is part of God's master plan, he hurts.

"I think about it," Easley tells the WaPo of his call. "Does one moment in your life really define who you are?"

Unfair as it is, for Easley and the general public, the answer has been yes.

From WaPo:

He walks into the gymnasium at Allan Hancock College in Santa Maria, during a high school basketball tournament. [Dana Cusack], whose husband works FCA events with Easley, spots him first. He hasn't been around lately. He sees her, touches her fingers.

"I was sad for you," she says. "But I was proud of the way you handled it."

He nods, smiling of course. He ignores the sounds he's so used to: bouncing balls and squeaking shoes. Easley leans in.

"I thought about it like, 'Why is it happening to me?'?" he tells her.

This is the moment it becomes clear: Regardless of how Easley or any of the replacements handle this, or seem to handle it, they unknowingly sacrificed themselves and their reputations so that the NFL machine could keep running. As the regular season winds down, they are mostly forgotten. But in towns like this, in school buildings and offices, in communities and churches, men like Easley are left to search for normality even in the places they call home.

You can read the whole piece here.

And, Seattleites, considering how the Seahawks have benefited from Easley's infamous and all-too-human mistake, you may want to consider sending him a Christmas card.

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