Obie Eating Mug.jpg
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Obie the dachshund
Obie is a 5-year-old dachshund. A big dachshund. Like, so big that he made the paper in his new hometown of

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The Story of Obie the Obese Dachshund

Obie Eating Mug.jpg
Facebook
Obie the dachshund
Obie is a 5-year-old dachshund. A big dachshund. Like, so big that he made the paper in his new hometown of Portland.

The good news for Obie is, if all goes as planned, he won't be this big forever. A 77-pound purebred, said to be a good 40 pounds overweight - easily qualifying Obie as obese - the dog was recently adopted by a PDX EMT and Certified Nursing Assistant who's got a plan for trimming Obie's canine waistline.

According to the Oregonian, Nora Vanatta of Portland - who also has a degree in animal science and eight years experience as a certified vet technician - follows Oregon Dachshund Rescue on Facebook, which is where she first heard about Obie. The organization posted a call for help about the overweight dog from a relative of his first owners, who are said to be elderly and in failing health. Vanatta tells the Oregonian that the couple would give Obie food to demonstrate their love.

And, apparently, they showed Obie A LOT of love.

Vanatta wanted to help, so she agreed to adopt Obie, and soon a volunteer from Seattle transported the dog to her down in Portland. While Vanatta knew what she was getting into, and knew Obie was overweight and needed help, as the Oregonian notes, even she wasn't expecting a gargantuan 77-pound Dachshund to show up on her doorstep.

Obie from Behind.jpg
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Obie the dachshund from behind

On the bright side, Obie provided a prime opportunity for Vanatta to put her schooling to work; she's crafted a new health regimen designed to get the dog, slowly but surely, back down to a more reasonable weight.

As the Oregonian notes:

Vanatta is working with a Purina representative to feed Obie a low-fat, high-protein diet that also contains isoflavones, a natural bioactive compound designed to reduce oxidative stress in overweight dogs.

While he's unable to do an actual exercise just yet, Vanatta will introduce him to hydrotherapy and perhaps a treadmill. Sin his bones and joints are under so much stress, she's waiting for him to slowly gain muscle mass as he begins to lose weight just by eating better.

As is to be expected in this day and age, Obie has a Facebook page -- titled "Biggest Loser, Doxie Edition -- where you can track his weight loss. Vanatta tells the Oregonian she sees Obie's situation as an opportunity to bring awareness to problem of obesity in both dogs and humans.

Previously on The Daily Weekly:

In Case You Missed It: Henri the Existential Cat is Famous

Killing Seagulls in the Name of Public Safety

Man Grows 'Quiet' After Girlfriend Informs Him of Dinner Party Invitation - Then Allegedly Kills Her Parrot with Fork

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