Newspaper Mug.jpg
While it's slightly less juicy than chronicling the craziness of Pacific Mayor Cy Sun , the headlines generated by the slow demise of the traditional

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Survey: Only 61 Percent of Small Town Folks Would Miss Their Local Newspaper

Newspaper Mug.jpg
While it's slightly less juicy than chronicling the craziness of Pacific Mayor Cy Sun, the headlines generated by the slow demise of the traditional print journalism and people's changing news-gathering habits aren't stopping either. There's always some bit of game-changing news trickling in about traditional newspapers and their struggle to adapt with the times. And this morning, appropriately via my Twitter feed, I came across some more.

As Poynter highlights, according to a recent Pew Internet & American Life survey, only 61 percent of folks in small towns say they would be impacted by the closure of their local newspaper. In big cities only 54 percent of people reported they'd miss the local paper.

Not surprisingly, according to the Poynter recap:

Residents of big cities "are particularly likely to get local news through Internet searches, Twitter, blogs, and websites of TV and newspapers," the survey says, while residents of small cities and rural areas are more likely to still rely solely on traditional print and broadcast media.

Meanwhile, residents of big cities and their suburbs are significantly more likely to "participate" in the news by commenting or sharing, and are more likely to get news on mobile devices. ...

While none of this may be particularly shocking, it does help illuminate the continuing shift in the way people get their news and their reliance on traditional models of journalism - even in small towns. The Poynter recap has a number of graphs and charts from the Pew study that further flesh out this shift, and since - if you're reading this - you're obviously a skilled Internet news gatherer, I encourage you to head on over and check it out.

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