Bobcat.jpg
Usually, plot lines surrounding prison breaks involve someone breaking OUT of prison. But a tale of something breaking IN to prison is a whole different

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Bobcat Break-In at Monroe Correctional Facility No Cause for Concern, According to Officials

Bobcat.jpg
Usually, plot lines surrounding prison breaks involve someone breaking OUT of prison. But a tale of something breaking IN to prison is a whole different ballgame ... especially when that something is a wayward bobcat

As the Associated Press reported earlier today, a confused bobcat found its way into the Monroe Correctional Complex late Monday night. Startled by prison guards conducting a routine perimeter check, the bobcat reportedly made its way atop the roof of the special offenders unit. There, the animal was shot with a tranquilizer gun by veterinarian Roger Hancock and taken to Pilchuck Veterinary Hospital in Snohomish for treatment of the injuries it sustained while climbing through razor wire at the prison.

The good news for animal lovers is the bobcat survived the traumatic experience relatively unscathed. Though it did sustain cuts from its encounter with the razor wire, according to an update to the story published by the AP not long ago, the bobcat was stitched up without issue and has since been transported to the Sarvey Wildlife Center in Arlington. The plan is to let the bobcat recuperate before releasing it back into the wild.

The Monroe prison is the state's largest, home to roughly 2,500 offenders spread over five units with varying security levels.

Speaking of security, how does the fact a bobcat can break into the prison bode for the chances of criminals breaking out of the facility?

The AP has that angle covered to, producing some ultra-obvious yet still entertaining quotes from prison spokesperson Susan Biller.

From the original AP account of the bobcat break-in:

"Yeah, I'd call it weird," she said. "We need to assess how he even got in."

But she doesn't think it's a security risk.

"Bobcats can jump and do things I don't think a human can," she said. "The fencing is designed to keep people in, not cats out."

She's got a point, right?

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